Yellow spots on top growth

Hi everyone. I’m a first time grower. I was given this plant around 10 weeks vegetation age. I have it in promix soil, 5 gallon bucket. I pH the water to 6. I feed once every two weeks. Water probably every 2-3 days. It is under a thousand watt LED 18/6. I am very new to this.

I have noticed yellow spots coming up all over the top section of the leaves now. This has been ocurring for about three or so days.

Help!

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@dbrn32 @garrigan62,
Welcome to the forum. I tagged a couple people who mite help

Need pics taken in natural/ white light. Can’t really tell with the pics you posted.
Could be bugs eating

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turn off grow lights and take picture

@MelissaK

I beleave this is your problem my friend

Solution to Leaf Septoria

This fungus spores may stay in the soil over the winter, and attack your plants in the summer. Spores are also easily spread by wind and rain.

Immediately (and carefully) remove all affected leaves to get rid of as many spores as possible.

Prune any leafy parts of the plant to improve circulation through the plant

Avoid getting water on the leaves or laying on top of each other – you want to avoid moisture

Make sure to keep the ground under your plant clean. Rake away all leaves and vegetation. Adding mulch can also help prevent spores from spreading.

Keep plants healthy, sicks plants are much more susceptible to leaf septoria than healthy plants

One way to help prevent this fungus from attacking your plants is to rotate crop sites or move to a new location every year.

A copper based fungicide or a broad spectrum fungicide may be effective at stopping the fungus from spreading though they are best used as a preventative.

Depending on exactly what’s causing your leaf spot, Neem Oil may be used to help combat the problem. Neem Oil will leave an unpleasant taste/smell on buds when used to treat flowering plants, so don’t let this stuff get near your buds! You will need a mister (also called a “One-Hand Pressure Sprayer”) to spray all the leaves evenly, since neem oil and water can separate easily. Try spraying just a small part of the plant and see how it reacts first before spraying the whole thing. Solution to Leaf Septoria

This fungus spores may stay in the soil over the winter, and attack your plants in the summer. Spores are also easily spread by wind and rain.

Immediately (and carefully) remove all affected leaves to get rid of as many spores as possible.

Prune any leafy parts of the plant to improve circulation through the plant

Avoid getting water on the leaves or laying on top of each other – you want to avoid moisture

Make sure to keep the ground under your plant clean. Rake away all leaves and vegetation. Adding mulch can also help prevent spores from spreading.

Keep plants healthy, sicks plants are much more susceptible to leaf septoria than healthy plants

One way to help prevent this fungus from attacking your plants is to rotate crop sites or move to a new location every year.

A copper based fungicide or a broad spectrum fungicide may be effective at stopping the fungus from spreading though they are best used as a preventative.

Depending on exactly what’s causing your leaf spot, [Neem Oil]

(https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004QAWGIO/ref=as_li_ss_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B004QAWGIO)

may be used to help combat the problem. Neem Oil will leave an unpleasant taste/smell on buds when used to treat flowering plants, so don’t let this stuff get near your buds! You will need a
[mister]

(https://www.amazon.com/Chapin-1002-48-Ounce-Sprayer-Multi-purpose/dp/B00002N8OB/ref=as_li_ss_tl?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00002N8OB&pd_rd_r=W4A5MVZWMFWH74AT55F1&pd_rd_w=UPVXy&pd_rd_wg=EwzKa&psc=1&refRID=W4A5MVZWMFWH74AT55F1)

(also called a “One-Hand Pressure Sprayer”) to spray all the leaves evenly, since neem oil and water can separate easily. Try spraying just a small part of the plant and see how it reacts first before spraying the whole thing.

Thank you so much for the help! I thoroughly read this and will start the process. Here are some updated pictures taken in natural light.

Oh also I forgot to mention! This occurred just a day or two after I sprayed the leaves with ph’d water. I assuming that was a bad idea and might have caused this?

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Yes, spraying with the lights on can cause spotting as well, the drops of water can act like a magnifying lens. Should also be setting the water ph to 6.5 rather than 6.

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Is it possible that I have overfed the plants too? I use the organic promix and on the bag it says it feeds the plants for three months. Do I still need to add nutes?

You should not be adding nutes with that soil, not until they need it.

Thanks :smile: How will I know they need it?

When the plant doesn’t look as dark green, as it gets to a lighter green or any slight yellowing of the lower leaves will be the sign that the nutes are running out and you need to start adding. Really best to start a weak feeding before that happens, but hard to tell with that kind of soil when that’s going to be. If it really is 3 months, you may never have to feed but I suspect you will need some flowering nutes halfway thru flowering for the extra P and K needed at that stage.