Worm castings as only nutrient

My girls are doing so well with the worm castings enriched ProMix BX and castings tea at each watering, as long as they continue to do so well I’ll stay with it. But I’m wondering about flowering cycle?
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Good question. I’m currently only using fish emulsion but plan on adding worm castings to next years grow soil. I’m interested to see what others suggest for the flowering stage :thinking:

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I would just top dress with 0-7-0 or similar guano and just water…
Worm castings is good stuff indeed

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your way above my pay grade on this… you know that @garrigan62 is your man on this

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Old thread yes, but how did your plan execute to go strictly worm castings? I’m in the middle of my first grow with the exact same approach / attitude: to grow with strictly worm castings as the nutrient input.
So far so good methinks! I have enough worm bins now that I can probably legitimately call it a worm farm. I feed them our food waste and they return the highest quality organic fertilizing soil amendment for free. They buffer pH, and I haven’t once even had to check my pH or even adjust the water I put into the plant. I did however use bone meal as a high phosphorus amendment about 2 weeks into flowering. Not sure it was required really, considering that “analysis of worm castings reveals they are richer in plant nutrients than soil, about 2 times more calcium, 5 times more nitrogen, and 7 times more phosphorus and potassium - K.P. Barley Ph.D.”

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Got worms?

Interesting short article tip I found…

A free tip from us about the most organic of fertilizers: worm castings. As you may know, worms are raised commercially for sale to gardeners. The breeders put the worms in organic compost mixtures and while the worms are reproducing they eat the organic matter and expel some of the best marijuana food around. After the worms have eaten all the organic matter in the compost, they are removed and sold and the remains are then sold as worm castings.

These castings are so rich that you can grow marijuana in straight worm castings. This isn’t really necessary however, and it is somewhat impractical since the castings are very expensive. If you can afford them you can, however, blend them in with your soil and they will make a excellent organic fertilizer.

This is mostly what I am using applying as a tea when watering and foliar spray.

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