Why use ice when there's snow available. Is that ok?

In previous grows I’d flush with ice and water. Last night my area guy hit with 7+ inches of snow. So I grabbed some fresh snow and watered my ladies with it.
Is this a bad thing?

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I shouldn’t think so. Cold is cold. Snow is actually a little insulating so it should be ok.

Unless it is yellow or otherwise misused.

:grin: sorry, the 13 year old boy that lives in my head is responsible for that statement.

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It certainly should melt more quickly than ice given the air space between the crystals, but honestly it depends on how much air pollution your area has.

But honestly for short term use, it should be fine.

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:rofl::rofl::rofl: First thing I thought, what if it’s dirty? Gasp, what if it’s yellow?!?!

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OMG @Syndrix - The phrase “If it’s brown flush it down. If it’s yellow let it mellow.” water conservation campaign slogan popped into my head.

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:rofl::rofl::rofl::point_up_2::point_up_2::point_up_2:

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I made sure I got white snow off my garden bed. My boys and dogs know that’s area is no bueno.:joy:

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Hey! Could someone explain the idea behind this. I’ve not heard of using ice water to flush or even snow?

So the idea is you’re cooling down the root zone, simulating the onset of winter. The colder temps are supposed to bring out her fall colors.

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I too would like to know more about this icing? Is this for soil, coco or hydro? Newb here

Oooooooooooohh I get it now. How long do you leave it on for?

Well it melts… :grin: I’m too stoned, here’s a good article:

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Depending on the strain the snow or ice water help bring out the color of the flowers. The plants seem to frost up more. Or that could be my imagination.

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I think y’all are nuttier than a box of squirrel turds. A few night time temps with a difference of 10- 15 degrees will bring out your color and different phenos. No need to shock an almost tropical plant with cold water ect…Not to mention bringing outside contaminants into the grow room.

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The environment in my tent runs on average 74 degrees with the lights on and 60 degrees with the lights off. So in my own observation it seems that this statement has about as much relationship to the truth as a collection of folksy sounding colloquialisms. :grinning: Loose at best.

The only way it seems I’ve been able to get much color is by starving the plant of nutrients late in flower, a practice that was recently dismissed as “bro science” by Dr Bugbee. My last run (pictured) I fed all the way to the end.

I didn’t get much color in spite of the temperature differential. The snow was a bit of a Hail Mary attempt on the final night before chop. I don’t think it did anything.

I like experimenting though, once in a while I am able to learn new things. :wink:

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Just use Alaska morbloom. It’ll knock your pH out of way and the colors follow

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Okay so
Ima newbie here
And am really just interested in this
But really?! You can just, like, throw snow in your pots to water them and they like that?! :scream:

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Not necessarily true. I had a plant last year during a major freeze in Texas and the plant did not change colors. Stayed in the high 30’s to low 40’s as the highs. It depends on the strain.

This year its a different story. Its had less cold days and this plant is my first ever color change. I planned this grow in hopes for color change. It did and I am so happy. Not that it changes the high at all but that purple is sexy.

I fed her only 1 week back in Dec. Still enough nutrients in the soil. She smells like a wild berry patch in the mountains. Very potent smelling plant. If I lived inna HOA or a town aka or city this strain would need carbon filters.

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Lovely.