What's wrong with my plants?


#1

Sent by a fellow grower, see attachement:


#2

Looks like a calcium deficiency, possibly caused by too much potassium, a Ph problem, or too dry or wet soil. Ph should be above 6.5, assuming the plant is growing in soil. If overfeeding is the problem the plant should be flushed first, and calcium added later on.
The soil should feel moist, but not wet. If you push your finger into the soil there should be no water bubbling up to the surface.


#3

I’ll bet on pH problems. Had one of my ladies looking like that last grow. Got the pH under control and she took off after a little recovery period. If I have picked up anything from this site in the last 6 months it is this: pH is at the heart of most any growing problems involving nutes. (I feel like I’m chanelling MacGuyverStoner ) lol Seriously, MacGuyverStoner, Latewood and several others are AWESOME on helping out with problems. I was amazed at how many times it was pH at the bottom of it. That and over/under watering.


#4

Agreed, what is the pH? Inquiring minds would like to know :wink:

I’d also like to know nutrient concentration in the soil with a EC or TDS/PPM measurement, as well as what the nutrient/feeding regiment consists of?


#5

I think a Support ticket is in order here. Fill this out the best you can, and add anything you feel in pertinaate.


split this topic #6

I moved 2 posts to a new topic: How do I start a new forum post?


#7

ive tried 3 grows. they all went perfect until flowering.i use cfl bulbs… do I have to use less wattage and lumins when flowering begins? about how much for 1 plant.HELP thanks iowa


#8

Your best results would come from a hps bulb and wattage depends on area of grow room, for flowering you need more of a red and orange spectrum, and the bulb should be 2700 kelvin, 5500 Kelvin bulbs are equivalent to direct sunlight, and well give descent results, my opinion though a hps does great


#9

What is pH
pH is a measure of the hydrogen ion concentration of a solution. Solutions with a high concentration of hydrogen ions have a low pH and solutions with a low concentrations of H+ ions have a high pH. This may seem like a confusion way to express these reationships, and it is, until you understand what pH stands for. The equation that defines pH is given as follows:
pH=-log[H+] concentration,

which is read:
the pH is equal to minus the log of the H+ concentration.

For example is the H+ concentration is very low, lets say about 0.0000001M, then the pH is
pH= -log[.0000001] whis is the same as -log[1 X 10-7]
the term log[1 X 10-7] = -7

  • (-7) = 7
    Look at the following table

hydrogen ion concetration pH solutions with a pH of
.1M 1
.01M 2 coke and orange juice
.001 3
.0001 4
.00001 5 black coffee
.000001 6
.0000001 7 pure water
.00000001 8
.000000001 9 baking soda
.0000000001 10
.00000000001 11
.000000000001 12 household bleach
.0000000000001 13 oven cleaner
From this table you will notice a few relationships

a difference of one pH unit (ie from pH 2 to pH 3) is a ten fold (10X) difference in H+ ion concentration.
pure water should have a pH of 7.0
solutions with a pH below 7.0 are termed acidic and solutions with a pH above 7.0 are termed basic.


#10

I’m not sure why you tagged that to Latewood, and also if you meant it because I asked about pH and “inquiring minds want to know”, I didn’t ask what is pH? Latewood and I both know it is short for “potential hydrogen”. I asked “what is THE pH?” as we needed the info from the person asking what was wrong with their plants. But thanks for sharing anyway, I’m sure somebody found the information useful.

~MacG


#11

Actually, generally more wattage/lumens is needed during flower.

~MacG


#12

Wow! I am sure glad I spent time reading this. So; .1 is a tenth; Got it :slight_smile:

Interesting out of the blue explanation. Peace


#13

That’s why I posted the chart for you guys, see after all it helped you out lol


#14

Thanks. I actually like the chart; I just felt the need to provide a bit of comic relief :slight_smile: Members will find this interesting and useful. In fact I ma copy it to a GrowFAQ for future re:


#15

Awesome I’m glad you found it helpful, and hope other members find it just as helpful, new growers may find it a little difficult to understand at first but the more they read it the more it will make sence :sunglasses:


#17

Hello I was hoping you could tell me what’s wrong with my plant in the picture it’s the only one out of 10 doing this. It’s my first indoor I have them under LEDs and a bright heat lamp at a distance with 2 fans on them. It’s the first picture the other ladies are fine. Any information would help.


#18

Whats your ph?


#19

You just knew that question was coming :wink:


#20

Always, that’s the most common thing here is ph ph ph lol, one of the most important things for a plants life, I know it’s not the right person who posted the question but for when they check in as well they will see it, it looks to me like a nitrogen toxicity or ph is to high more than likely nitrogen toxicity though, and the signs of that are how the leaves are folding down


#21

@Majiktoker As a result of reading this thread I got inspired to go check my PH for the first time. Results were neutral at just under 7.0 so I’m feeling pretty good about the soil mix I created.