What does complete darkness truly mean?

I see a lot of growers using the term “complete darkness” which made me wonder if there is such a thing in the outdoor/natural world (specifically where cannabis would grow). Whilst in my garden last night, the sky was dark, but the ambient light was mainly provided by the moon. Does the term complete darkness truly mean what it says or is it just a point where light would be considered too low to have any effect?

Correct me if I am wrong but:
I also noticed in some time lapses that I am able to “see” entire growth phases from seed to harvest. At no point did I lose visual on the growth or else there would have been portions of the grow stages in complete darkness.

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Night vision camera to see in dark.

Indoor growers prefer complete darkness as it is easier to mess the plant up indoor with lights hitting plants during dark time (lights out)

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Outdoor plants are less sensitive to light pollution during the night cycle.

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If you have flood lights in your yard, I wouldn’t put the plants anywhere near them. Moonlight and light from far off streetlamps is one thing but…

I have a theory that the plant decides what is completely dark while it is a young plant. For example, a plant that spends its life from seedling through veg in an area with nights that have a high amount of ambient light will flower ok as long as there isn’t more ambient light than it got used to. That’s just a theory of mine, and shouldn’t be taken too seriously.

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explain why my plants start indoors for a couple months under lights with dark periods and dont have a sex change operation wgen I put them in the greenhouse?


Definitely a girl!
I think there is not enough evidence to prove the needed threshold of extraneous light or intensity to cause sex changing. I believe that hermaphroditic tendencies are in the genetic code at birth and environmental stress of some sort or multiple issues ould trigger the gene. It happens in outdoor plants too!

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I agree with @Cannabian. Every living organism is embued with genetics that aren’t always expressed, unless subjected to certain environmental factors or stress.
I see this gene as a genetic mutation, that was propagated, due to it’s higher efficiency of reproduction.
In a natural environment, the plants won’t receive ‘true darkness’ with the moon and stars, although, this is still registered as darkness, lest they couldn’t flower and reproduce.
I’m not sure how much validity there is to this but, I’ve heard, as a general rule of thumb, as long as the light pollution, during dark cycle, isn’t 3x the magnitude of the moon, then you’re in the clear. Could just be speculation.
@KJ & @AAA make good points too.
Adaptation!

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Interesting theory! This growing this is so fascinating as there are so many reasons and outcomes.

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Grow stores sells what’s called Black-out Clothes. Make rack or green house over plant, and throw this Black-out Cloth over the green house, and it drops your plant into total Darkness. Now, the cat is out of the bag. @Jamezium @Cannabian @KJ @AAA @BetrayedSoul @Growyourown

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https://www.google.com/search?q=blackout+cloth&oq=black+out+clo&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l4.27235j0j4&client=ms-android-mpcs-us-revc&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8

Blackout cloth is a 70% Polyester/ 30% Cotton blend fabric that is coated with multiple layers of thin rubber. It is suitable for use in a variety of settings (indoor/outdoor) with accurate color and clarity when ambient light is controlled. This material is extremely sturdy and is best for a fixed frame where it will be stretched evenly to a frame in all four directions. It also works for a tensioned hanging mount.

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You can order industrial strength black poly, from Northern Greenhouse Supply virtually any size, you can have it seam welded and grommets if you want. Reasonable pricing too.
I have no affiliation with them other that buying greenhouse poly. Thats a disclaimer

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Sounds plausible.

Perhaps they’re young enough and still able to learn while vegging. It’s the light during lights out of flowering that makes them turn.

This may have credibility. But here’s my anecdotal evidence.
The only Plants I’ve ever had herm were from questionable genetics. I did save seeds from those plants and attempted to grow them. I germinated 6 last year. 5 remained indoors the entire time, and 1 was transplanted outdoors after about 5 weeks from seed.
Every single one of those plants that were grown indoors turned herm. They were in the same tent with ilgm and some other genetics. The 5 questionable ones produced nanners, while the other genetics went to harvest without herming.
Guess what… the one that vegged and flowered outside did not have a single nanner.

Much like the soil food web, I think there’s a lot going on that we cannot see or fathom. It’s the interaction of nature and millions of years of evolution.

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Could be the case, that outside, bees and other insects get to pollinate your plants too, inside they don’t. Lack of other pollination code / genetic material turns them inbred… And their own code gets screwed up, and they jump species, from female to male. Or being both at same time. Man I’m glad Mankind’s genetic makeup isn’t that way. @Drinkslinger @Growyourown @Cannabian

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Reminds me of a quote by Neil Degrass Tyson. “As the diameter of our knowledge grows, so too does the perimeter of our ignorance.”

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My plants sprouted New years day, and were not transfered to the greenhouse until May. They were intentionally kept small to fit in my grow room by root restriction. I also gradually turned my lighting from 18/6 to 16/8 before I planted out. Bybthe time they hit soil, they were completely malnourished and totally rootbound. A week after transplant they were looking very happy :blush:

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Then again, their questionability could simply be from how we perceive hermies. As humans, we see a strong phenotype as one that produces the biggest and most potent buds, but for the plant, they simply want to produce the most seeds, with the strongest genetics. Or the fact that we simply don’t ‘select’ these phenotypes from nature, because of this reason. No one is ‘selecting’ hermies, because they don’t want the seeds, unless you breed, but they still show up in our gardens when the genetics are questionable. But, it could be different in nature. They could be perceived as ‘strong’ in nature, because of their ability to pollinate themselves. If we look at monecious annuals, like sunflowers, they have an extremely high reproduction rate, because of this ability. We just don’t call them herms, because it’s in their nature to produce both male and female parts on each flower.
I do, however, completely agree with you. Just trying to shine some light on perception of ‘strong genetics’ by humans vs plants lol

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i firmly believe that the hermie thing, is a gene that is stronger in some plants than others. In plants that have been cultivated by farmers for many years, and have been allowed to open pollenate, there may be less tendency to herm? In plants that are repeatedly cloned for breeding moms and dads it may cause that gene to be more prevalent? I have not had a heritage photo hermie on me ever, Ive had modern hybrids hermie a few times, seems more than a coincidence?

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I have some more research on this since ya’ll really going in a bigger direction from which I originally intended ahah… this is all great info and cause for greater exploration! love this and thanks

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That makes complete sense. If the plants are allowed to reproduce naturally, they have less of a probability to try “plan b”.

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That’s what happens when you have inquiring minds that think alike hahaha

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Seems like I’ve seen a study going on right now by Dr.Bugbee on how much light pollution affects cannabis.


I’m dying to see the outcome
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