Sheeep poopie good or bad ?!

Hello scubie here I have started mixing my soil wit sheep poop cuz a family member used sheep poop with the clones I gave him the plants were beautiful ones I posted it on my. Other tread so go look. But any why I started this. can to much sheep poop give the plant nute burn if added to much also looking for tricks with any poopies

Scuubster Man, the sheep shite may have residual sheep medicine in it so you will be ok if you get liver fluke or sheep scabies…seriously though, don’t do it and if you do it should be composted for at least 6 months…I reckon it would put the NUTE BURN ZAP on your pot and this will make you sad…saying that , if you do use it then please report back to us all on the forum.
I live in deep sheep country in western Wales UK and the Welsh would never use it…
I also believe it would promote a good head of hair though.

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Sheep manure is great it works very well here in the US with no problems like anything it should be composting for at least a month or 2 you can make a tea with it a cup of manure to 2 gallons of water put in a bubbler for a fish tank let it sit over night and then ph and feed. Pig shit will really bring the terpins out to i have used both of these my favorites i amend my soil with is cow and horse manure, pig and chicken manure with some worm castings i use a handful of each and 1/4 cup of worm casting and mix with soil i add azomite and glacier rock dust at a tablespoon each and this is for 5gal air pots . If not sure how long the manure has been composting put some in a pot poor distilled water through and read the ph and ppm there’s a chart for what you’re numbers mean and i think it’s on organic manure or organic garden i can’t remember i will post it if i can find it

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You could use the sheep poo to make your own worm castings and tea - Geoff Lawton has a great video about it on YouTube. I’ll use cow poo because I have it handy but sheep should work just as well

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Using Manures Fresh manures can replace fertilizers altogether. To supply the most nutrients, use them in the spring before planting. Apply and incorporate fresh manures about a month before starting your spring garden to give the manure time to mellow. This is particularly important when you’re using fresh poultry manure. It’s high in ammonia and can “burn” plants if applied directly. Fresh manures, however, can harbor nasty pathogens like E. coli. To minimize food-safety risks, as opposed to maximizing nutrients, fresh manures are best applied in the fall. This gives pathogens time to break down in the soil. In fact, organic agriculture standards require that fresh manures be applied four months prior to crop harvest. Unfortunately, this reduces the nutrients available to plants during the growing season. Find what works for you to reduce risk and maximize nutrients. It is also critical to handle and store manures safely. Don’t let fresh manures touch the parts of the plants you plan to harvest. This is particularly important for leafy greens and fruits eaten raw. Wash your harvest thoroughly before eating or distributing the food. Of course, wash your hands and tools after handling manures to avoid cross-contamination. Hot composting at temperatures of 145° Fahrenheit can also kill most pathogens. To ensure manure safety, follow the instructions for hot composting, and make sure your pile reaches the correct temperatures. It is also important to store manure carefully. Make sure that it is covered properly. Letting rainwater run off or leach your manure pile not only removes valuable nitrogen, it can pollute surface and ground water. Water leached from compost can also contaminate other parts of your garden with pathogens.
Because fresh manures are nutrient dense, limit applications to less than 1/2 inch. Spread the manure on the soil surface and incorporate 6 to 8 inches deep. For high-nitrogen poultry manures, apply less than 1/4 inch. When exposed to the atmosphere, nitrogen is quickly lost through volatilization. Because of this, be sure to incorporate fresh manures within twelve hours of spreading. Composting manures reduces risk from pathogens. To amend garden soils prior to planting or to prepare a new lawn or perennial bed spread 1 inch of composted manure and mix to a depth of 6 to 8 inches. Apply 1/2 inch if tilling to only 3 to 4 inches or if topdressing in a perennial garden. You can also mix composted manure into planting holes for shrubs and trees or use as mulch around perennials. Manure is also a great green material for both pile and sheet compost. Be sure to add some brown material to balance out nitrogen-rich hot manures. Manures containing bedding often have the right green-to-brown ratio to compost alone. Horse manure, for instance, has a C:N ratio of 30:1 and doesn’t require any green or brown additions.
Hope this helps you

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It’s store bought so I think is good but this is my first time using my plants we’re getting yellow and to feed 50 plants every other day cost way to much so I am trying it out I just top dressed my soil with it and wAtered

Some are green as can be loving it others yellow

If it’s store bought, it’s been pasteurized and all pathogens have been killed off. Best of luck with your grow, may you be blessed with an abundance of buds.

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Yes me too it’s been a week so far u think I should give them some nutes the yellow ones or should I wait

What was the the NPK ratio of the :poop:? Best take a run off sample of each to compare your PH and TDS.

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Not gonna lie haven’t checked it once they starting to go green they are loving it I can’t tell how they jumped

the one is dwc bucket is afganie passion named by one of friends here on ilgm so far I got mostly females on the home made seeds great looking plants and they’d a funky looking seed :eyes: I guess thay all can’t be perfect :ok_hand: afganie passion and scubie snack

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are you aware that the pots are well below the legal limit for growing pot…big up for big buds.

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What do you mean pots are below league limits

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Your solo cup babies are probably root bound as hell. Replant into 3 gal or 5gal ASAP.

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Yes I know if I transferred they would be big I have no room that’s why I didn’t :frowning: I need other tent to do another 15 into flower

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