Ro machines how many filters needed GPD?

Ok so I’ve been grabbing all my water from work or buying distilled from Wal-Mart but starting to become a pain. Was wondering what everyone is using for RO machines. I have hard well water around 200 ppms. Not sure if I need 3, 4, or 5 stage. 50, or 100 gal? Im only using soil right now but plan on going to hydro within 6 months or so. Will run in my basement into a 50 gal garbage can that way when it runs over it runs right into sump pump hole/drain.

I bought this set up and love it. My well water was close to 400. There are two stages to it depending on which ID line you hook up. With your ppms you could use the 1st stage. It takes me about 5-6 hours to fill the 55 gallon barrel I store in.

You could produce a little quicker

1 Like

Important question: are you planning on ever drinking this water?

@AfgVet, 400? Wow… I wish mine was 400. Friggin 860 here!

I was all worried about my plants when I first tested our water, then I saw the numbers and said screw the plants, what about my family?

4 Likes

I normally buy all drinking water for family no matter what. We cook with our well water thats about it. It doesnt have to be drinking water but another thing I am worried about is my water pressure is pretty bad here although down the line I can buy a booster pump if needed. I had a pure 100 that was able to keep up with my 6-8 dwc buckets changing them out every 3-4 days no problem.

The reason I ask is because the filtration stages start with removal and end with addition. The goal is to remove contamination, but pure RO water, depleted of all minerals, is quite harmful to humans. Distilled water is very bad for people, unless ions have been added back to it.

If it’s just for hydroponics, does it make sense to start with a comprehensive well-water analysis? I’d want to know if the RO system should have a filter for lead. Then you can buy a filtration system based on your needs. Once you have clean water, you’re adding back ions via your fertilizers.

If local water testing is $300, you can probably skip analysis and jump right to comprehensive filtration.

2 Likes

What about the 0 water filters that take everything out? Should I get rid of it, that what we are drinking.

1 Like

Mine was 450, but they changed the purification process I am assuming because it smelled like fish for a couple days and went back to normal but now our ppms are at 250.

1 Like

@KeystoneCops I know there is science out there that supports your statement, but form a purely observational standpoint I will disagree. I have a friend who is a boxing trainer, very fit and seemingly healthy(I don’t go to his doctors appointments with him) and he has been drinking distilled water for 10 plus years as his only water source. No apparent issues.

4 Likes

There is a link between positive ions and health but I only saw it associated with being in proximity to moving water (think sitting by a creek).

200 ppm is low and if it were my water supply I don’t believe I’d bother with R/O. My water is 550 ppm (not as bad as @AAA!) so necessary here. @Not2SureYet has done grows where he blends our tap water 50/50 with R/O for about 250 ppm.

To directly answer your question though: I use the R/O Buddie:

My tap water comes out at around 8 ppm.

3 Likes

I’m not a doctor, but you should tell your physician you’re drinking RO water. My understanding is they can deplete your body of minerals (calcium in your bones, for example). I would drink bottled drinking water until I sorted this out.

2 Likes

Ok cool, so my question then is if my city water is at 250 ppms and I just want to get rid of things like lead chlorine etc do they have filters that leaves the calcium and other beneficial minerals?

2 Likes

Anecdotally, I’ve heard of people having severe health impacts after a few months of RO water. I cannot say with certitude that it’s good or bad, but we learned about osmosis in grade school Science, and I postulate that’s the action by which RO water will harm you.

3 Likes

That’s a great question. I believe if you look at GE whole house filters (non-RO) you will find examples of that, but I’m not 100% sure.

3 Likes

Cool I will look into it, thank you!!

4 Likes

I could be wrong here. But isn’t bottled water just ro for most cases. I know the machines that are out side of the stores here that fill water bottles you bring. Are just ro systems.From what I have read. Any thing under 200 is ok for our plants. In the 100 range is better. My ppms with the 50/50 water is 280 I have to use the hard water micro for my nutes. Plants grow fine this way.
I will have to check out the ro for drinking though. I use t for my coffee every day. I am reading the label on my bottled water now and i says, Processed by advanced filtration and reverse osmosis technology’s. I am going to have to look into this now that you bring it up. :grin:
Ro is recommended by most sites for using on our plants though.

1 Like

I water with my 860 PPM water without issue so far. I also alternate randomly with RO.

2 Likes

Many RO filtration units have a final filter stage that remineralizes the water. Those should be produce water that’s good to drink.

1 Like

That’s in soil, right?

If you are gonna use GH stuff it is recommended to start with R/O.

Reverse Osmosis is a method used to produce water on par with distilled. I personally would have no qualms about using R/O for my primary drinking source.

3 Likes