Overwatering or underwatering?

I am having difficulty understand what is going on here. The 2 wilted looking plants are giving me trouble. I have barely watered them. Yet when I give them water they wilt. The soil is dry. Very little dampness deep in soil

Fox Farm Ocean Forest Mixed with Happy Frog

HLG 350R

Distilled Ph’d water

Blue Dream are the ones suffering.

Humidity:55
Temp:75 f



You pH distilled water?

The ones droopy look thirsty.

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It’s physically impossible to pH distilled water. Your adjustments would be going direct to the root zone. Which is not a good look. Distilled water will automatically take on the pH of the medium. Add calmag if you want to adjust.

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Did you do anything different to them?

That may be a problem. I’m a less is more grower. I keep my plants hungry and thirsty. I always feed at half the recommended rate and I barely water my plants.

I water the plant every 2-3 days. Once a week I completely soak the plant by either watering to runoff (you have to water slowly for coco in fabric pots) or actually submerging the pot in a bucket (my preferred method, but you can’t always do it.). I gauge my plant by lifting them up to feel thier weight. It might take a bit but you’ll soon be able to tell when they need watering.

So, if you haven’t already and the pot is dry, give them a good soak. At this point, I don’t believe that would hurt them.

If you’re distilling you’re own water, remember that most of a plants immobile nutrients are obtained from the water. There will be none in distilled water. I don’t know that this problem is caused by your water. You’re probably okay with Happy Frog. That’s what I use and I don’t have any issues. Just a heads up.

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This is sound advice but, it isn’t just distilled water that won’t hold its own PH but will instead adopt the PH of the medium it’s poured into. RO water has this same issue. Any water underneath 100ppm dissolved solids will not hold its own PH. You can adjust it with ph up or down and you will get readings on your PH pen but as soon as you pour it into your soil, or whatever, it will change. Beware when using cal mag for this, cal mag contains nitrogen. It’s NPK is 2-0-0 (at least for botanicare) I bought a gallon of


And it is 4.5-0-0.

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100 is what we commonly say, yes. But at 15ppm water is “hard”. You can pH any hard water. It would just be really touchy. But is possible once over 15.

IMG_4278_480x480

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I stand corrected?
If it will be touchy, why would you do it?

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I wouldn’t. I just like to be factual.

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Appreciate that. I’m glad I asked, thought I’d given mildly bad advice for a second there.

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For ppm, water isn’t hard until 120-180. You have to look at mg/liter for ppm.

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Unfortunately what is and isn’t hard is a general guideline. Many say different things. But moderately hard is still hard. And that’s half if 180 according to USGS . Gov
Hardness is caused by compounds of calcium and magnesium, and by a variety of other metals. General guidelines for classification of waters are: 0 to 60 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as calcium carbonate is classified as soft; 61 to 120 mg/L as moderately hard; 121 to 180 mg/L as hard; and more than 180 mg/L as very hard. if you ask the Culligan man. Anything over 15ppm is hard. And he’s not incorrect, but he also wants to sell you something.

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Yes but you’re still going to have a hard time getting a proper ph reading at ppm that low. There is equipment that can but it’s really pointless since even if you were able to ph adjust it, it’s going to change in a matter of minutes. And it will just assume the ph of whatever it’s poured into since it’s still technically neutral.

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Yup. I merely wanted to point out it was possible, nothing about probable.

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I’m sure there are uses for it. It’s just not something our hobby will find applicable.

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