Never seen this before! Any ideas?

My white widow leaves do not look right. It’s kind of hard to see in the pic but there are off colored yellow lines in the middle if the leaves? Only 1 plant doing it. Any ideas or help would be appreciated. Ph is good and I didn’t over or under water it. My other 24 look perfect. Thanks

Answer these simple questions the best you can.
If you do not know, or do not use something; Just say so = NA

Strain; Type, Bag seed, or NA

Soil in pots, Hydroponic, or Coco?

System type?

PH of runoff or solution in reservoir?

What is strength of nutrient mix? EC, or TDS

Indoor or Outdoor

Light system, size?

Temps; Day, Night

Humidity; Day, Night

Ventilation system; Yes, No, Size

AC, Humidifier, De-humidifier,

Co2; Yes, No

Add anything else you feel would help us give you a most informed answer. Feel free to elaborate, but short, to the point questions and facts will help us help you smile


appears to be Mag def possibly Iron but would need more info to narrow it down for sure

White widow fem
Fox farms soil right in the ground inside a greenhouse
Fox farms grow big nutrients
T5 lights to extend daytime to 18 hours
55\85 temp night/day
Humidity 65%
No vents open
Humidifier
No c02

Possibly open the vents you want fresh air getting to your plants at least an hour a day and once a day (the more the marrier) lol and I agree with @DonaldJ now that more info is provided it sounds like iron or magnesium deficiency, possibly could be a calcium or nitrogen deficiency as well

1 Like

I do open them when I can but temps here sometimes don’t get above 32 during the day so I can’t leave them open. How do I fix the deficiency?

iron may be the problem figure 18
.
(site)

1 Like

Cal mag def usually starts with older leaves zinc and iron start more at the top

1 Like

How do I fix it?

Ok after further homework I am leaning back towards Calcium
Calcium Deficiency:
Young leaves are affected first and become small and distorted or chlorotic with irregular margins, spotting or necrotic areas. Bud development is inhibited, blossom end rot and internal decay may also occur and root may be under developed or die back. Deficiency will cause leaf tip die-back, leaf tip curl and marginal necrosis and chlorosis primarily in younger leaves. Symptoms: young leaves develop chlorosis and distortion such as crinkling, dwarfing, developing a strap-like shape, shoots stop growing and thicken
Epsom salt or a Cal-mag supplement from your garden store
just getting dose info on epsom salt

1 Like

2 tbls in a liter of water Epom salt (Magnesium phosphate) over the counter any pharmacy or walmart thing with cal-mag def is it is most often caused by a ph issue in soil grows

2 Likes

I just checked the soil it’s at 8.3 which is hi. I put ph down in my nutrients to get it to 6. What else should I be doing? Do I need to ph down on my water only days too?

I always Ph any water my plants get all the water is doing is rehydrating the nutrients stored in the soil if your soil ph is that high I would look at watering and feeding with a low ph just to get it to ballance out a bit more. I would consider a 5.8 ph just to try and over compensate for the soils higher ph

if you were in pots I would have more to offer in way of advice hope was able to get you heading down the right track atleast happy growing :slight_smile:

I appreciate your time and knowledge I’ll give that stuff a try and let you know what happens. You think I should go in pots next time?

More control if your ph was out in a pot you can flush with proper ph’d water basically rinse until ph is back to where you want it :slight_smile:

@Skywalker22, I hope you don’t feel I am picking on you, I just want to illustrate an situation we come across over and over in the forum, and I have been known to get crazy about pH, pH, pH!

And I 'd like to use this as a learning and training moment for everyone, even our wonderful new volunteer helpers, and you have some of our newest and very good and experienced helpers here that offered you a lot of help

It is not uncommon we get the grower saying right off the bat that pH is good, and it sometimes turns out this is actually not true…

and then…

This is why I often insist on specifics, pH in water, pH of soil, and why I kind of added this specific breakdown to my extended version of Latewood’s “Support Ticket”.

Again, this is why I get all crazy and repeat myself pH, pH, pH! LOL

Because the pH absolutely in all these areas is very important, they can all be related and all affect each other.

So then Majik say this:

Majik probably assumes these just by the look of the leaves and comparing to the different leaf symptom charts he loves, even before we know the pH, and he’s probably not wrong. But that is kind of a lot of work and the hard way or route to it.

Notice in the chart for soil – after we know the pH, we can clearly see iron(Fe) becomes quickly unavailable much above 6.5 in soil, and manganese. And at 8 or above, yes, nitrogen becomes unavailable – as well as Boron, and even phosphorous, calcium and magnesium start their decrease in availability as well – at about, or a little above, this pH level.

And with foxfarm nutes and soil, and in fact in general with most decent soils and nutrient systems, all these are very likely in abundance in the soil and/or nutrient mix. And so it’s not really a deficiency, per say, but actually a pH lockout.

And so almost always a deficiency or toxicity, the most common reason for almost anybody to have problems with these is almost always going to be pH.

People in my opinion spend way too much time looking at the leaf symptom charts, straining their eyes, for what? Get the actual pH numbers first, and get that fixed and everything else will probably fix itself, if you get my meaning, lol.

Knowing what Majik figured out will help a more experienced grower, because then they can think about a foliar spray to get the needed possible deficiencies to the leaf right away and kind of bypass the pH lockouts, until the soil gets stabilized to the proper pH and then the roots can uptake those nutrients from the soil as normal.

But foliar sprays can bring their own problems, and it might not always be prudent to start a inexperienced grower down that road, as a foliar spay – if it is overdone or done wrong, this can kill their plant quicker than anything.

I know this was a lengthy explanation, but I just wanted to share this with everyone, so you can see how more often than not, it really is pH, pH, pH, and why I sometimes go off about pH like a ranting loon, lol.

Happy growing and learning,

MacG

3 Likes

Got it. Start with the ph first! Thanks for the help

I offer what help I can with the information given I did mention it is most likely a ph issue which is when the overly high ph came to light I was leaning towards fe or zinc by appearance and the cold night temps [quote=“Donaldj, post:10, topic:4231”]
2 tbls in a liter of water Epom salt (Magnesium phosphate) over the counter any pharmacy or walmart thing with cal-mag def is it is most often caused by a ph issue in soil grow
[/quote]
My answer was also a look for the cause reply not simply here do this, that is when more info was provided which in turn I suggested getting control of ph by watering with lower ph’d water since that would likely rectify the issue entirely there was little need to add or do anything else. The ph did lead me back to iron but the correction of the ph would fix it so no need to do anything else aside from deal with cause. :slight_smile:

Thanks for the lesson Mac I probably should’ve insisted on a ph to start with

1 Like

All you guys did a fantastic job diagnosing and helping, I’m not complaining at all, lol. And yes an epsom salt foliar spray, or even a little added to the nutrient mix is not a bad idea.

FYI, Epsom Salts is Magnesium Sulfate (MgSO4), no phosphorous in it.

It is hard to insist sometimes, because obviously we don’t want to not believe what growers tell us when they say pH is ok, but by at least insisting on an actual number measurement, we can kind of get the real truth sometimes when maybe the grower themselves might not really be aware the pH is so far out of range.

~MacG

3 Likes

Thank you for that, that I did not know, I’ll use it for futre reference and write in notebook with all other grow info if you don’t mind

1 Like