Mix the soil with the garden's soil for the pits


#1

Friends, I drilled 40 holes (deep = 75cm and wide = 90cm)
My garden has a fairly good soil (it has grown variety of flowers and ornamental trees, fruits and vegetables), but I like to mix it with compost and if needed, Peat Moss. Please quide me on their size and percentage.
How many percent should be the garden soil, how many percent of the compost, Let Me Know If i Need Anything like Peat Moss or something else, please advise. And if you know the only compost and garden soil is enough, please tell them their amount. I would appreciate if you respond as soon as possible because I have no time at all and I have to move the seedlings immediately to the ground, because they are still in the little pot, of course they are very healthy and I do not need to move it to a bigger pot and I want to move it directly tothe ground.


#2

They are good sized holes you have made. I use a lot of homemade compost, sometimes pure compost but only if it has been sitting for a long period of time and is well broken down. I also like to use a healthy portion of the original soil that was removed when digging the hole. If I had to give you a ratio I would say I use 70% ammended soil(compost and additives such as perlite etc) and 30% original soil. I also mound up leftover soil in a mound around my holes to help channel water to the plants and to contain mulch/ topdressing. Hope this helps.


#3

@garrigan65 is a good source for soil making questions he makes his own super soils
But it sounds like you have a good handle on things so far


#4

@Mazoo

Pick the one that best fit’s your needs. Hope this helps. Please let me know how it all go’s for ya…

Here are the amounts we’ve found will produce the best-tasting buds and strongest medicines:

8 large bags of a high-quality organic potting soil with coco fiber and mycorrhizae (i.e., your base soil)
25 to 50 lbs of organic worm castings
5 lbs steamed bone meal
5 lbs Bloom bat guano
5 lbs blood meal
3 lbs rock phosphate
¾ cup Epson salts
½ cup sweet lime (dolomite)
½ cup azomite (trace elements)
2 tbsp powdered humic acid

This is the same basic recipe I’ve been using for the past 15 years. The hardest ingredient to acquire are the worm castings (especially since many people don’t even know what they are. FYI: worm poop). But don’t decide to just skip them: Be resourceful. After all, worms comprise up to ¾ of the living organisms found underground, and they’re crucial to holding our planet together. Also, don’t waste money on a “soil conditioner” with worm castings; source out some local pure worm poop with no added mulch.

.


Now for the break out of this recipe for those that do not need a mix on this massive scale.

Subcool’s soil recipe broken down for the lazy folks

Full Recipe
8 large bags of a high-quality organic potting soil with coco fiber and mycorrhizae (i.e., your base soil)
25 to 50 lbs of organic worm castings
5 lbs steamed bone meal
5 lbs bloom bat guano
5 lbs blood meal
3 lbs rock phosphate
¾ cup Epson salts
½ cup sweet lime (dolomite)
½ cup azomite (trace elements)
2 tablespoons powdered humic acid

1/2 Recipe
4 large bags of a high-quality organic potting soil with coco fiber and mycorrhizae (i.e., your base soil)
12.5 to 25 lbs of organic worm castings
2.5lbs steamed bone meal
2.5lbs bloom bat guano
2.5lbs blood meal
1.5lbs rock phosphate
3/8 cup or 6 tablespoons Epsom Salts
1/4 cup or 4 tablespoon sweet lime (dolomite)
1/4 cup or 4 tablespoons azomite (trace elements)
1 tablespoon powdered humic acid

1/4 Recipe
2 large bags of a high-quality organic potting soil with coco fiber and mycorrhizae (i.e., your base soil)
6.25 to 12.5 lbs of organic worm castings
1.25lbs or 20 ounces steamed bone meal
1.25lbs or 20 ounces bloom bat guano
1.25lbs or 20 ounces blood meal
3/4 lbs rock phosphate
3/16 cup or 3 tablespoons Epsom Salts
1/8 cup or 2 tablespoons sweet lime (dolomite)
1/8 cup or 2 tablespoons azomite (trace elements)
1.5 teaspoons powdered humic acid

1/8 Recipe
1 large bags of a high-quality organic potting soil with coco fiber and mycorrhizae (i.e., your base soil)
3.125 to 6.25 lbs of organic worm castings
.625 lbs or 5/8 lbs or 10 ounces steamed bone meal
.625 lbs or 5/8 lbs or 10 ounces bloom bat guano
.625 lbs or 5/8 lbs or 10 ounces blood meal
3/8 lbs or 6 ounces rock phosphate
3/32 cup or 1.5 tablespoons Epsom Salts
1/16 cup or 1 tablespoon sweet lime (dolomite)
1/16 cup or 1 tablespoon azomite (trace elements)
3/4 teaspoon powdered humic acid

I have found myself in the Organic section of GC a lot lately and have learned a lot from the great group hanging out here.


#5

@garrigan Thank you for your prompt reply,
I have a few questions.

  1. How many kilograms is a large bag of potting soil?
  2. I have to mix all of these materials together, or there is a certain way to blend it like the layer to mixing layer that is shared on YouTube.
    3-Please suggest a way that I mix some garden’s soil with the stuff you said.
    4-Can you guess the approximate amount(how many kilograms) of needed soil for each pit to the dimensions given? I want to know how much soil I have to make.

#6

@garrigan65 Thank you for your prompt reply. Unfortunately, my guess was correct and I should have been transfered my seedlings immediately, but for some reason, like digging the pit and preparing my desired soil and etc, I could not move my seedlings to the main ground till now and today once the leaves of my dear girls fall and Every minute, getting worse, and I had to change the pots, I delayed the transfer to the main land. As a result, I put them under fluorescence light (T5). It’s been past 5 weeks of sprouting. For the first three weeks, the very good growth in a solo cup under 160 watts of T5 and two weeks later was also relatively good, but due to the small pot and low light (160 watts) in the first two growth weeks, They did not grow too large but were good And healthy, which, unfortunately, today, without any signs, leaves once overwhelmed and somewhat faded, of course, after the transition is getting better.
I have 36 plants. How many watts do I need fluorescents or new SMD bulbs for these 36 plants for a while while I transfer them to the ground later. Please reply soon. I need to buy the light as soon as possible.
I put 36 pots in a space of size:(Of course for now)
120 centimeters long, 80 centimeters wide, 80 centimeters high.


#7

@mountainman1 Thank you for your prompt reply. Unfortunately, my guess was correct and I should have been transfered my seedlings immediately, but for some reason, like digging the pit and preparing my desired soil and etc, I could not move my seedlings to the main ground till now and today once the leaves of my dear girls fall and Every minute, getting worse, and I had to change the pots, I delayed the transfer to the main land. As a result, I put them under fluorescence light (T5). It’s been past 5 weeks of sprouting. For the first three weeks, the very good growth in a solo cup under 160 watts of T5 and two weeks later was also relatively good, but due to the small pot and low light (160 watts) in the first two growth weeks, They did not grow too large but were good And healthy, which, unfortunately, today, without any signs, leaves once overwhelmed and somewhat faded, of course, after the transition is getting better.
I have 36 plants. How many watts do I need fluorescents or new SMD bulbs for these 36 plants for a while while I transfer them to the ground later. Please reply soon. I need to buy the light as soon as possible.
I put 36 pots in a space of size:(Of course for now)
120 centimeters long, 80 centimeters wide, 80 centimeters high.


#8

@Countryboyjvd1971Thank you for your prompt reply. Unfortunately, my guess was correct and I should have been transfered my seedlings immediately, but for some reason, like digging the pit and preparing my desired soil and etc, I could not move my seedlings to the main ground till now and today once the leaves of my dear girls fall and Every minute, getting worse, and I had to change the pots, I delayed the transfer to the main land. As a result, I put them under fluorescence light (T5). It’s been past 5 weeks of sprouting. For the first three weeks, the very good growth in a solo cup under 160 watts of T5 and two weeks later was also relatively good, but due to the small pot and low light (160 watts) in the first two growth weeks, They did not grow too large but were good And healthy, which, unfortunately, today, without any signs, leaves once overwhelmed and somewhat faded, of course, after the transition is getting better.
I have 36 plants. How many watts do I need fluorescents or new SMD bulbs for these 36 plants for a while while I transfer them to the ground later. Please reply soon. I need to buy the light as soon as possible.
I put 36 pots in a space of size:(Of course for now)
120 centimeters long, 80 centimeters wide, 80 centimeters high.


#9

How long until you plan to get them outside? That is a lot of pots in a relatively small space. Can you take them outside under a greenhouse or coldframe? Your t5 fixture may be enough to veg maybe a dozen plants for a couple of weeks tops.


#10

@mountainman1
I can transfer them out in the next few days, but I thought they needed at least 10 to 14 days to stay in the new pot after last night’s transfer from the solo cup to the bigger pot. Meanwhile, I can put them behind the window But my window does not get direct sunlight more than a few hours and is shadow the rest of the day. Meanwhile, my off period is from 4 pm to 10 pm, but the direct light behind my window starts from 1.1.5 to 6.7 pm. Is there no problem changing the time at the start of the third week of growth? Unfortunately, they are still not very large. I’ll take a photo but I would like them to be somewhat better. Then I’ll leave the picture because they were very good until yesterday. But fell below the leaves and yellow suddenly, however after the last night, they returned to life


#11

If all your pots fit in the space you have under the t5, and its only for a few days ,I would leave them there. They may stretch a little due to low light intensity but they will be fine. Get them outside into the sun as soon as you can.


#12

@mountainman1
The below photos are the Light behind the window before noon. In the afternoon, direct light will be further.

  1. Is there a problem that I change the light time? I am turning on from 10 pm to 4 pm the next day (18 hours) and then silence for 6 hours. Regarding the now timing, is it a problem to change and turn on the lamps from 1 am to 7 pm, until I can put them under the light almost right behind the window from 7 am to 1 pm, and a good light right behind the window from 1 afternoon to 7 pm?
    2.Given the change in the pots last night, is it okay to transfer them to the ground instantly?
    3.If it’s better to keep them in the new pot for about a week and then transfer it to the ground, how many watts of fluorescence light or SMS or LED would be enough? Or just enough 160 watts of light for hours that are not light, and for the rest of the hours under the indirect sunlight behind the window?


#13

@Mazoo

You need no less than 50 watts per plant.

But here I have this for you. It’s very large and you should copy and paste it to your files’
Your gouing to love this…let me know what ya think.

Your friend.

Will

Types of Lights for Cannabis Growing - Different Marijuana Lighting Sources

Light for cannabis plants

Without light, cannabis plants cannot grow. In the countries in which marijuana grows best,
the sun is the source of light. The amount of light and the length of the growing season in
these countries results in huge tree-like cannabis plants. In most parts of North America,
however, the sun is not generally intense enough for long enough periods of time to produce
the same size and quality of cannabis plants that grow with ease in Latin America and other
tropical countries.

Sunshine is most intense at the equator where it is closest to the earth. Some of the largest,
resin-coated buds in the world grow beneath this blazing sun. So what’s this got to do with
indoor growing? Plenty. Light is one of the most basic needs of all cannabis plants and the
most often mismanaged.

Even the most experienced growers forget about the basic needs of a cannabis plant, especially light.

The answer to the problem of lack of sun, especially in the winter months, shortness of the
growing season, and other problems is to grow indoor under simulated conditions. The rule of
thumb seems to be the more light, the better.

The common incandescent light bulb emits some of the frequencies of light the cannabis plant can use,
but it also emits a high percentage of far red and infra-red light which cause the cannabis plant to
concentrate its growth on the stem. This results in the cannabis plant stretching toward the light
bulb until it becomes so tall and spindly that it just weakly topples over.

There are several brands of bulb type. One is the incandescent cannabis plant spot light which
emits higher amounts of red and blue light than the common light bulb. It is an improvement, but
has it drawbacks. it is hot, for example, and cannot be placed close to the cannabis plants.

Consequently, the cannabis plant has to stretch upwards again and is in danger of becoming
elongated and falling over. The red bands of light seem to encourage stem growth which is
not desirable in growing marijuana. The idea is to encourage foliage growth for obvious reasons.

Flourescent light tubes range in size from one to eight feet in length so you can set up a
growing area almost anywhere. There are two types of flourescent lights; standard and the
wide spectrum. They can be used in conjunction with one another, but the wide spectrum lights
are not sufficient on their own. The wide spectrum lights were designed as a supplementary light
source and are cheaper than the standard lights.

Wide spectrum lights emit the same bands of light as the standard but the standard emit higher
concentrations of red and blue bands that the cannabis plants need to grow.

The wide spectrum lights also emit infra-red, the effect of which on stem growth we have already
discussed. If you are planning to grow on a large scale, you might be interested to know that the
regular fluorescent lamps and fixtures, the type that are used in commercial lighting, work well
when used along with the grow lights.

These commercial lights are called cool whites, and are the cheapest of the fluorescent lights we
have mentioned. They emit as much blue light as the standard grow lights and the blue light is
what the cannabis plants use in foliage growth.

Intensity

Now we come to the question of intensity. Both the standard and wide spectrum lamps come in three
intensities: regular output, high output, and very high output. You can grow a crop of cannabis
plants under the regular output lamps. The difference in using the HO or VHO lamps is the time
it takes to grow a crop.

Under a VHO lamp, the cannabis plants grow at a rate that is about three times the rate at which
they grow under the standard lamps. People have been known to get a cannabis plant that is four
feet tall in two months under one of these lights.

Under the VHO lights, one may have to raise the lights every day which means a growth rate of ate
least two inches a day. The only drawback is the expense of the VHO lamps and fixtures. The VHO lamps
and fixtures are almost twice the price of the standard.

Now that you have your lights up, you might be curious about the amount of light to give you cannabis
plants per day. The maturation date of your cannabis plants is dependent on how much light they receive
per day. The longer the dark period per day, the sooner the cannabis plant will bloom. Generally
speaking, the less dark per day the better during the first six months of the cannabis plant’s life.

If your cannabis plants receive 12 hours of light per day they will probably mature in 2 to 2.5 months.
If they get 16 hours of light per day they will probably be blooming in 3.5 to 4 months. With 18 hours
of light per day, they will flower in 4.5 to 5 months. Its a good idea to put your lights on a timer
to ensure that the amount of light received each day remains constant.
Energy Emissions In Arbitrary Color Bands
40 Watt Flourescent Lamps
In Watts and Percent of Total Emissions
Daylight Cool White Gro-Lux GroLux WS
Light Type Band Watts % Watts % Watts % Watts %
Ultra-Violet -380 0.186 2.15 0.16 1.68 0.10 1.42 0.27 3.16
Violet 380-430 0.832 9.60 0.72 7.57 0.70 9.67 1.07 12.48
Blue 430-490 2.418 27.91 1.98 20.78 1.96 27.07 1.22 14.29
Green 490-560 2.372 27.38 2.35 24.67 1.02 14.02 1.24 14.49
Yellow 560-590 1.259 14.53 1.74 18.27 0.10 1.42 0.83 9.77
Orange 590-630 1.144 13.21 1.69 17.75 0.44 6.05 1.36 15.93
Red 630-700 0.452 6.22 0.81 8.47 2.86 39.55 1.86 21.78
Far Red 700-780 0.130 1.53 0.07 0.81 0.06 0.80 0.69 8.10
Total 8.890 100.0 9.52 100.0 7.24 100.0 8.54 100.0

Grow Light Guide

Horticultural lighting systems allow you to extend the growing season by providing your cannabis
plants with an indoor equivalent to sunlight. This is a great advantage for those of you who
appreciate having a year-round supply of fresh flowers, veggies and herbs. Artificial lighting
is also a great way to jump-start spring by starting your seedlings months ahead of the last frost.
There are three main types of horticultural lighting systems.

In summary, marijuana has a lust for light. HP sodium lamps produce 20% more light than super metal
halides. Horizontal reflectors yield up to 40% more light than vertical reflectors. Hammer or pebble
specular, anodized aluminum or white are the most reflective surfaces for hoods. Mirror finish is
the absolute worst reflective surface for a hood. Hang 400 watt lamps at 18-24” above garden, 600
and 1000 watt lamps, 24-30” above garden. Use a light meter. Grow the strongest, healthiest cannabis
plants that reach their maximum potential for resin production. Bright light brings big buds.

HID (High Intensity Discharge) Lighting

HID lighting is the most efficient way to convert electricity into light that is available to
the consumer. There are two types of HID grow lights used for horticultural lighting:

HID Light Efficiency

Metal Halide - MH

Metal halide bulbs produce an abundance of light in the blue spectrum. This color of light promotes
cannabis plant growth and is excellent for green leafy growth and keeping cannabis plants compact.
It is the best type of light to be used as a primary light source (if no or little natural sunlight
is available). The average lifespan is about 10,000 cumulative hours. The bulb will light up beyond
this time but due to the gradual decline of light, it is not worth your while to wait for the bulb to
finally burn out. If you compare their lumen (brightness) per unit of energy consumed, metal halides
produce up to 125 lumens per watt compared to 39 lumens per watt with fluorescent lights and 18 lumens
per watt for standard incandescent bulbs.

High Pressure Sodium - HPS

High pressure sodium bulbs emit an orange-red glow. This band of light triggers hormones in
cannabis plants to increase flowering/budding in cannabis plants. They are the best lights
available for secondary or supplemental lighting (used in conjunction with natural sunlight).
This is ideal for greenhouse growing applications.

Not only is this a great flowering light, it has two features that make it a more economical
choice. Their average lifespan is twice that of metal halides, but after 18,000 hours of use,
they will start to draw more electricity than their rated watts while gradually producing less
light. HPS bulbs are very efficient. They produce up to 140 lumens per watt. Their disadvantage
is they are deficient in the blue spectrum.

If a gardener were to start a young cannabis plant under a HPS bulb, she/he would see impressive
vertical growth. In fact, probably too impressive. Most cannabis plants would grow up thin and lanky and in no time you will have to prune your cannabis plant back before it grows into the light fixture. The exception to this is using a HPS light in a greenhouse. Sunlight is high in the blue spectrum which would offset any stretching caused by HPS bulbs.

Common manufacturers of metal halide and high pressure (HP) sodium lights include Philips,
General Electric, Iwasaki, Venture, and Osram/Sylvania. Many of the manufacturers buy and use
the same components, often manufactured by competitors. Most often the bulbs have the exact same
technical statistics.

Lighting Chart - A guide for wattage per square foot.
HID Light Output Primary Growing Area Supplemental Area
100 watts 2’ x 2’ 3’ x 3’
250 watts 3’ x 3’ 4’ x 4’
400 watts 4’ x 4’ 6’ x 6’
600 watts 6’ x 6’ 8’ x 8’
1000 watts 8’ x 8’ 12’ x 12’

HID Lighting Helpful Tips

Hanging height: Due to the heat that is emitted from these types of fixtures, you should hang
them according to size. Smaller wattage systems (100 and 250) should be hung about 2 feet from
the tops of the cannabis plants. Medium wattage systems (400 and 600) should be hung around 3 feet
from the top of the cannabis plants. High wattage systems (1000 and up) should be placed at least
4 to 5 feet from the cannabis plant tops.

How long should lights run?

This depends on the type of cannabis plant. Most cannabis plants and vegetables need about
10 to 12 hours of light to promote growth. cannabis plants that produce fruits or flowers
will show improvement with up to 16 hours a day of supplemental light.

Fluorescent Lighting

This type of light is perfect for starts and seedlings. They are also popular for growing low-light
cannabis plants like herbs and African violets. Fluorescent lights are low intensity and need to be
placed within 8" (up to 15" for shade loving cannabis plants) of the cannabis plants to be effective.
They are a poor light source for flowering and budding primarily because of their low lumen output.

Daylight Cool White Gro-Lux GroLux WS
Light Type Band Watts % Watts % Watts % Watts %
Ultra-Violet -380 0.186 2.15 0.16 1.68 0.10 1.42 0.27 3.16
Violet 380-430 0.832 9.60 0.72 7.57 0.70 9.67 1.07 12.48
Blue 430-490 2.418 27.91 1.98 20.78 1.96 27.07 1.22 14.29
Green 490-560 2.372 27.38 2.35 24.67 1.02 14.02 1.24 14.49
Yellow 560-590 1.259 14.53 1.74 18.27 0.10 1.42 0.83 9.77
Orange 590-630 1.144 13.21 1.69 17.75 0.44 6.05 1.36 15.93
Red 630-700 0.452 6.22 0.81 8.47 2.86 39.55 1.86 21.78
Far Red 700-780 0.130 1.53 0.07 0.81 0.06 0.80 0.69 8.10
Total 8.890 100.0 9.52 100.0 7.24 100.0 8.54 100.0

Grow Light Guide

Horticultural lighting systems allow you to extend the growing season by providing your cannabis
plants with an indoor equivalent to sunlight. This is a great advantage for those of you who
appreciate having a year-round supply of fresh flowers, veggies and herbs. Artificial lighting
is also a great way to jump-start spring by starting your seedlings months ahead of the last frost.
There are three main types of horticultural lighting systems.

In summary, marijuana has a lust for light. HP sodium lamps produce 20% more light than super metal
halides. Horizontal reflectors yield up to 40% more light than vertical reflectors. Hammer or pebble
specular, anodized aluminum or white are the most reflective surfaces for hoods. Mirror finish is
the absolute worst reflective surface for a hood. Hang 400 watt lamps at 18-24” above garden, 600
and 1000 watt lamps, 24-30” above garden. Use a light meter. Grow the strongest, healthiest cannabis
plants that reach their maximum potential for resin production. Bright light brings big buds.

HID (High Intensity Discharge) Lighting

HID lighting is the most efficient way to convert electricity into light that is available to the
consumer. There are two types of HID grow lights used for horticultural lighting:

HID Light Efficiency

Metal Halide - MH

Metal halide bulbs produce an abundance of light in the blue spectrum. This color of light promotes
cannabis plant growth and is excellent for green leafy growth and keeping cannabis plants compact.
It is the best type of light to be used as a primary light source (if no or little natural sunlight
is available). The average lifespan is about 10,000 cumulative hours. The bulb will light up beyond
this time but due to the gradual decline of light, it is not worth your while to wait for the bulb to
finally burn out. If you compare their lumen (brightness) per unit of energy consumed, metal halides
produce up to 125 lumens per watt compared to 39 lumens per watt with fluorescent lights and 18 lumens
per watt for standard incandescent bulbs.

High Pressure Sodium - HPS

High pressure sodium bulbs emit an orange-red glow. This band of light triggers hormones in cannabis
plants to increase flowering/budding in cannabis plants. They are the best lights available for
secondary or supplemental lighting (used in conjunction with natural sunlight). This is ideal for
greenhouse growing applications.

Not only is this a great flowering light, it has two features that make it a more economical choice.
Their average lifespan is twice that of metal halides, but after 18,000 hours of use, they will start
to draw more electricity than their rated watts while gradually producing less light. HPS bulbs are
very efficient. They produce up to 140 lumens per watt. Their disadvantage is they are deficient in
the blue spectrum.

If a gardener were to start a young cannabis plant under a HPS bulb, she/he would see impressive
vertical growth. In fact, probably too impressive. Most cannabis plants would grow up thin and
lanky and in no time you will have to prune your cannabis plant back before it grows into the light
fixture. The exception to this is using a HPS light in a greenhouse. Sunlight is high in the blue
spectrum which would offset any stretching caused by HPS bulbs.

Common manufacturers of metal halide and high pressure (HP) sodium lights include Philips,
General Electric, Iwasaki, Venture, and Osram/Sylvania. Many of the manufacturers buy and use
the same components, often manufactured by competitors. Most often the bulbs have the exact same technical statistics.

Lighting Chart - A guide for wattage per square foot.
HID Light Output Primary Growing Area Supplemental Area
100 watts 2’ x 2’ 3’ x 3’
250 watts 3’ x 3’ 4’ x 4’
400 watts 4’ x 4’ 6’ x 6’
600 watts 6’ x 6’ 8’ x 8’
1000 watts 8’ x 8’ 12’ x 12’

HID Lighting Helpful Tips

Hanging height: Due to the heat that is emitted from these types of fixtures, you should hang
them according to size. Smaller wattage systems (100 and 250) should be hung about 2 feet from
the tops of the cannabis plants. Medium wattage systems (400 and 600) should be hung around
3 feet from the top of the cannabis plants. High wattage systems (1000 and up) should be placed
at least 4 to 5 feet from the cannabis plant tops.

How long should lights run?

This depends on the type of cannabis plant. Most cannabis plants and vegetables need about
10 to 12 hours of light to promote growth. cannabis plants that produce fruits or flowers
will show improvement with up to 16 hours a day of supplemental light.

Fluorescent Lighting

This type of light is perfect for starts and seedlings. They are also popular for growing low-light
cannabis plants like herbs and African violets. Fluorescent lights are low intensity and need to be
placed within 8" (up to 15" for shade loving cannabis plants) of the cannabis plants to be effective.
They are a poor light source for flowering and budding primarily because of their low lumen output.

Incandescent Lighting


#14

@garrigan65
Where should I copy and paste?
Dear garrigan I can transfer them out in the next few days, but I thought they needed at least 10 to 14 days to stay in the new pot after last night’s transfer from the solo cup to the bigger pot. Meanwhile, I can put them behind the window But my window does not get direct sunlight more than a few hours and is shadow the rest of the day. Meanwhile, my off period is from 4 pm to 10 pm, but the direct light behind my window starts from 1.1.5 to 6.7 pm. Is there no problem changing the time at the start of the third week of growth? Unfortunately, they are still not very large. I’ll take a photo but I would like them to be somewhat better. Then I’ll leave the picture because they were very good until yesterday. But fell below the leaves and yellow suddenly, however after the last night, the they returned to life.

The below photos are the Light behind the window before noon. In the afternoon, direct light will be further.

Is there a problem that I change the light time? I am turning on from 10 pm to 4 pm the next day (18 hours) and then silence for 6 hours. Regarding the now timing, is it a problem to change and turn on the lamps from 1 am to 7 pm, until I can put them under the light almost right behind the window from 7 am to 1 pm, and a good light right behind the window from 1 afternoon to 7 pm?
2.Given the change in the pots last night, is it okay to transfer them to the ground instantly?
3.If it’s better to keep them in the new pot for about a week and then transfer it to the ground, how many watts of fluorescence light or SMS or LED would be enough? Or just enough 160 watts of light for hours that are not light, and for the rest of the hours under the indirect sunlight behind the window?


#15

great lighting info from @garrigan65. Mazoo I think i am confused as to what you are trying to achieve with this grow. Is it too cold in your area at the moment to put the plants outside now? Is the available light hours in your area less than 12 hrs of sunlight ?If your outdoor light hours are less than 12hrs sunlight and you are planning to veg indoors for a month or so I think your available space may be too small for the amount of plants you have. I do not recommend altering light schedules as this can stress the plants quite a lot.


#16

@mountainman1
No, I’m in Iran and the light is excellent. Sorry I confused you. My only problem is that I transmitted them 24 hours ago and I’m afraid that stress will come to them if I transfer them again very soon, like the day after tomorrow. If you know there is no problem, I’ll transfer it to them after tomorrow evening.


#17

ok now I understand. I would take your plants outside and leave them in the pot that they are in for a few more days to minimize the stress of the first transplant. The week outside will give them time to acclimatise to their new home , then you can put them in the ground.


#18

@Mazoo

When you do go to transplant them again if you can get some Hydrogen peroxide and some Root stimulator and mix two cap full Hydrogen Peroxide and 2 mil of Root stimulator this will help them not to stress works for me every time.


#19

@garrigan65
Thank you for your prompt reply,
I have a few questions.

How many kilograms is a large bag of potting soil?
I have to mix all of these materials together, or there is a certain way to blend it like the layer to mixing layer that is shared on YouTube.
3-Please suggest a way that I mix some garden’s soil with the stuff you said.
4-Can you guess the approximate amount(how many kilograms) of needed soil for each pit to the dimensions given? I want to know how much soil I have to make.
5-Is it not necessary to fertilize until the harvest stage if I make this soil?


#20

@garrigan65
The amount you said (two cap full Hydrogen Peroxide and 2 mil of Root stim) should I use it to any plant in the pot, and then transfer it to the pit, or I have to transfer it to the ground after passing it to the root, or mix it with a certain amount of water and Then irrigate every plant after the transfer to the pit? Please explain the full story because I have no idea that how much and how I should give them and I am a beginner and, at the same time, very sensitive and to some extent even obsessed. So I’m sorry if I’m annoying you with my questions.