Happy Hunger Games Journal.... "May the Odds be Ever in your Favor"!


#1
              Let the Games Begin ... 😆

This is our first indoor grow so the title seems fitting to me… :seedling::seedling::seedling::seedling:
We’ve been hangin around here for awhile reading, learning and asking questions. So far everyone has been extremely helpful and friendly. We’re looking forward to learning more as we grow!
So far we’ve got the ILGM seeds soaked and neatly tucked in their nice litte Air Pots (1liter). We’re just waiting for them to pop out.
1 White Widow (F)1 Gold Leaf (F), 1 Blueberry Auto (F) and 1 LowRyder Auto (F)


We have these outside until they pop thru (good temps and humidity)
We currently have two plants from bag seed in our grow tent flowering. We have converted an old chest of drawers to use as a place for seedlings w/ LED light and fan. Hopefully our timing works out to have the tent for these baby’s when needed… If not, we’ll adjust our plans… :four_leaf_clover:
To be continued


Calibrating TDS meter with distilled water?
#2

Tag me in please! :grinning:


#3

Hey there @70sChick
I’ll bee watching as well tag me when you update
:cowboy_hat_face: :v::+1: CB


#4

Tag me in please! This is going to be fun!!


#5

Thanks @Rugar89 @Countryboyjvd1971 @GetbackJoJo

I’ll definitely tag ya’ll in the updates. Happy to have ya’ll in the game. :+1:


#6

Definitely watching @70sChick !! Girls on fire :rofl:


#7

I think the one on the left is “Katniss” :stuck_out_tongue:


#8

Exactly @FreakyDeekie Baahaaa…


#9

@greenthumbfun I’m definitely naming the LR on the left Katniss! Thx :sunglasses:


#10

The girls are breaking ground now. Three out of 4 so far. I’m thinking the WW will pop out tomorrow.
Here are a few pix of whats happening now.
We have the girls in small air pots filled with a mix. The bottom half is Pro mix bx with a small amount of worm castings, 3/4 Pro mix 1/4 worm castings. The middle half is Pro mix and organic seed starting mix 3/4 pro mix 1/4 organic seed starter and the very top 2 1/2 inches is Pure organic seed starter. We’re currently only misting the mix around the seedlings. Our plan is to let the girls grow here until these pots are full of roots and then we’ll transplant in to smart pots (3 or 5 gal for Autos) and (7 gal) for photos. I’m guessing this may take 3 weeks or so… The waiting starts again… :seedling::seedling::seedling::seedling:
I certainly see how folks end up planting way more seeds than needed! There’s not much to do at this point :sunglasses::seedling::v:
@Countryboyjvd1971 @Rugar89 @GetbackJoJo
@garrigan65

Glad to have my other plants to play around with and keep me occupied… this is their 3rd week of 12/12. I’ve been doing some LST along the way with these two. This morning one of the larger limbs was trying to break/split off at the bottom. So I used tape to put it back together and used some florist wire to help keep the strain off. The same thing happened a few days ago to the smaller one. Used tape on it then, Now you can’t notice there was ever any problem. Seems it never missed a beat. Hoping the same for this one.
These two are growing so fast! I hope after this week they slow down some. I did go in a clean them up some by taking off the smallest growth down low. Anyway… I’m rambling on here… Hope ya’ll enjoy the update and pix. Hopefully things will get more exciting soon. It feels good to have seeds germinating…


#11

@70sChick

As far as your seedling go the worm casting will not harm them at all they love that stuff. Where ever the worm castings are the roots will seek it out and that’s just what you want.
For that broken branch add a little honey. It’s a natural healent will heal up that wound on your plant quickly…I use it when ever it happens to me.

Will


#12

Thanks Will. I’ll definitely try the honey trick tonight when the lights come on.

I’ve been reading up on the worm castings and the different bat guana. And different ways to use them. I just started using Hydrofarm Guano Bloom Crazy Premium Bat Guano and worm castings on the two bigger plants. (They love it!) @garrigan65

As far as the seedlings and worm castings, Can I use a stronger mix like 1/2 Pro mix and half worm castings? I thought I read where someone uses them to germinate seeds in. Was that you?


#13

@70sChick

Most likely was. I’m going to give you what i have on the worm castings and Bat Guano. Don’t the Guano with the seedlings ok

Copy and paste what i send you for you personal referene

There are several types of Guano.

Bat guano comes in different types. The N-P-K ratio of the guano is dependent on what the type of bat it came from and what it’s diet consists of. For instance, Mexican bats eat bugs so their guano is high in nitrogen. While Jamaican bats feed on fruit, so their guano is high in phosphorus. Lets explore some different types of guano and their application.

Mexican Bat Guano (10-2-1). This type of guano is very high nitrogen. This makes it perfect for the vegetative stages of growth. Even when the plant is young it can be fed a dilute mixture if the soil happens to contain very little nutrients. This type of guano can be used throughout the vegetative stage of growth.

Peruvian Seabird Guano (10-10-2) This type of guano is NOT bat guano. It comes from Peruvian seabirds and is very “hot”, meaning it will burn plants very easily if prepared incorrectly or over applied. Not good for flowering due to high nitrogen content.

Jamaican Bat Guano (1-10-0.2) This type of bat guano is high in phosphorus. It is perfect for the early-mid flowering cycle once females are well established.

Indonesian Bat Guano (0.5-12-0.2) This type of guano is the ultimate low-nitrogen, high-phosphorus bat guano. It is perfectly suited for the end of the flowering cycle before the final flush. This drops nitrogen levels low to cut growth and signal the autumn harvest as well as provide a huge resource of phosphorus to bulk up buds and add to trichome count.

As you can see, ideally you use Jamaican for early to mid flowering and Indonesian for late flowering. This is the best answer I can come up with. Hope it helps. Good luck on your grow.

     Worm Castings vs. Bat Guano

Worm Castings Vs Bat GuanoGardeners and farmers know the importance of properly balanced nutrients in the soil. Bat guano is an excellent source of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, all very important for your plants to thrive. Guano is also a good soil conditioner, both enriching the soil and improving drainage and texture, much like worm castings. Select marijuana growers use bat guano to develop their plants, although having it shipped in from a different continent is no easy task.

Similar to worm castings, bat guano can be used as a top dressing to the soil, or made into a tea to be sprayed onto the plant directly. Unlike worm castings, you should pay attention to the nutrient balance in the guano you purchase as they differ depending on the type of guano you use, and guano should be applied in smaller amounts, as too much could harm your plants by oversaturating them with nitrogen.

It is important to note that guano should only be obtained from fruit and insect feeding species, but luckily, that is most of the bat population. Of over 1,000 different species of bats, less than ten feed on animal blood and those species are largely found in Latin America.

The downside of bat guano is that it is expensive, often costing four times as much as worm castings, even before shipping costs. Unless you live in Jamaica, Sumatra or Indonesia, it may be difficult to obtain local bat guano that is the most desirable for plants. Bats live everywhere, of course, but certain species generate better fertilizer, and those species tend to prefer tropical cave-dwelling.
Worm Castings vs. Compost

There is no doubt that composting is a beneficial and responsible way to use up food scraps in your home. Vegetable scraps, coffee grounds, fruit peels and cores can all be added to a (preferably neatly contained) pile in your backyard that will eventually be mixed and turned with dead leaves, grass clippings, and other yard scraps to become gloriously rich and nutritious “black gold”. Composting is an essential way to restore vitality to depleted soil and recycle your organic waste.

Worm Castings Vs CompostLike most things, your compost pile is a tiny ecosystem. You should not introduce any diseased plants, molds, or anything chemically treated. These unwanted contaminants will not magically go away, but could rather infect your entire compost pile and then anything that compost comes in contact with.

You should also chop up any large pieces you would add to the pile to facilitate faster breakdown. Any veteran composter will know that adding those avocado skins and pit to the pile won’t harm it, but you will be seeing them for a long, long time. Furthermore, you should never add meat, fish, fat, citrus peels, dairy, bread, rice, feces (human & animal), sanitary products, treated paper or sawdust to your compost bin.

The ideal compost pile is a balanced mix of nitrogen and carbon. This is by no means definitive, but a rule of thumb is that food scraps tend to yield nitrogen and yard scraps tend to yield carbon. Combine in a handy composting container, which can be made of wood, plastic, or anything similarly durable. Metal containers are not ideal as they will corrode over time.

Inside the bin, your compost will begin to heat up and break down. This heat is caused by microbial metabolism and is dependent on the size of the compost pile, the carbon to nitrogen ratio of the materials, the moisture content and the aeration of the contents.

Composting is somewhat labor intensive, what with turning and monitoring the materials, but it is worth it to keep your food scraps out of landfills and help out your soil. As the compost heats up, however, that heat can kill off many beneficial microbes necessary for optimum plant heath and considerable nitrogen loss. Therefore, you should compost and nourish your soil every year and supplement that practice with local, microbe-rich worm castings.
See the recommended ratio of worm castings/compost mix.
Worm Castings vs. Chemical Fertilizers

Chemical Fertilizers are BadSoil is a living organism and should be treated as such. Chemical fertilizers “kill” the soil while organic fertilizers improve and sustain the soil.

Chemical fertilizers contain acids, including sulfuric and hydrochloric acids. Think about what loose, dry soil looks like in your hand when you scoop up a handful. It should have a crumb-like texture if you are able to scoop it up. Chemical fertilizers break up the particles that form these crumbs, destroying the soil structure. The result is a compacted surface that prevents water from penetrating the earth’s crust, causing even more problems for your plants that then need more solutions, literally.

Chemical fertilizers also affect the soil’s pH and kills the beneficial microbes living in the soil that are necessary to fortify plants with natural immunity to disease and destruction, including ants and earthworms, the best soil aerators.

Furthermore, chemical fertilizers are dangerous for the environment. Pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers are responsible for poisoning water, aquatic life, plant life, birds and mammals, including your pets.

Local, organic, microbe-rich worm castings have been tested and shown to yield 126% bigger, stronger plants when compared with traditional fertilizers. Use the earth’s organic fertilizer; treat your plants with worm castings instead of Dr. Frankenplant’s chemical compounds.
TIP: Try mixing worm castings with fertilizer.
Worm Castings vs. Manure

Worm Castings Vs ManureAnimal manure is a prime source of nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus. It is also rich in bacteria, and not just the good kind. Fresh manure should not be used on your edible garden or plants because first of all, it will probably burn and dehydrate your plants and second, the risk of exposure to nasty pathogens like E.coli and salmonella are likely.

When you see (or smell) farmers spreading manure, they are usually doing it in the fall to condition the soil over the winter, or to replenish nutrients in a field well before planting an edible crop.

Manure must be aged before use. Fresh manure has high acid levels that can burn plants. Aging it allows these acids to dissipate, and reduces the risk of pathogen exposure. That said, always prevent contamination when using manure as fertilizer by using gloves, and cleaning hands, tools and produce thoroughly.

Manure is aged by letting the manure sit out in the sun in a safe place (away from water runoff, pets and human interaction). You can pair it with carbon-rich materials like straw, shredded paper and leaves. Heat from the sun and the inherently-high nitrogen levels will “toast” the poop. Let it roast for at least six months until it is no longer stinky and all moisture has evaporated.

NEVER use the manure from a meat eater, i.e. humans, cats, dogs, lions, etc.

OR you could fertilize your lawns with non-toxic, organic, microbe-and-good-bacteria-rich, worm castings. Worm castings, also known as vermicompost, are inexpensive, NPK balanced, odor-free, ready-to-use and superb for your plants, no E.coli risk necessary.
Worm Castings vs. Chicken Manure

Worm Castings Vs Chicken Manure

Chicken manure is an excellent full-circle fertilizer for people that keep chickens at home. The average hen can make one cubic foot of manure every 6 months. Like other manures, you have to age it. Corral it with chicken wire and combine it with carbon-based matter like fallen leaves or dry grass clippings. If left unattended, it will be ready to use in 6-12 months. If turned occasionally, the manure can be ready in 4-6 months.

Chicken manure has high nitrogen levels, which can be overwhelming for a lot of plants, but is great if you have soiling lacking in nitrogen. Corn crops eat up nitrogen, so chicken manure is great if you are cultivating corn.

If you don’t keep chickens and need to use up all the poop they produce, or you need an organic fertilizer while your manure ages, you can fertilize your plants and garden with worm castings. You don’t have to be concerned about toxicity, and worm castings are rich with beneficial microbes and bacteria. Worm castings are also already perfectly balanced with nutrients so you don’t have to worry about burning your plants or over-fertilizing.


#14

Awesome information Will. Thank you very much. :v::sunglasses::seedling: i did copy this to keep for personal reference. :+1:


#15

@70sChick

I also have five recipes for the bat guano tea if you want. It’s for your plants…lol

Will


#16

#Oh wow! I’d love to have that information. @garrigan65. Sounds like liquid gold…:sunglasses: Thank you very much :v:


#17

Let me guess it’s best served with Cheetos
hookah

Oh arn’t we funny today…lol

weedBear_SW6V1T


#18

Baahaaa… :sweat_smile:


#19

@70sChick

Here ya go : and it’s not sweet tea " lol

Compost Tea Supercharges Marijuana Roots
By Gary Anderson

In the ongoing debate between supporters of “organic” marijuana versus hydroponics marijuana, you often hear about “compost tea.”

You get faster marijuana growth, larger/stronger marijuana roots, detoxified soil and root zones, and protection against root zone diseases and pathogens when you use bioactive compost tea.

If you use compost tea as a foliar spray, your marijuana plants gain some protection from powdery mildew, gray mold, mites, thrips, and other organisms that commonly plague marijuana plants.

Compost tea contains nutritional elements that feed marijuana through roots and leaves, but important benefits also come from microorganisms active in compost that transfer into the tea.

Compost tea is made from compost…a solid-material “fermented” mixture containing things like leaves and other yard waste, discarded food items (such as banana peels, egg shells, coffee grounds, veggies), and base materials such as old newspapers.

You combine such materials in the proper ratio, and then continue to maintain proper conditions (aeration, ambient temperature, pH) so the mixture microbially decomposes into a material rich in nutrition for cannabis plants.

Making compost is complex and time-consuming.

If your compost pile is improperly made or maintained, you get bad smells, and you may not get the decomposition temperature range (130-157 degrees Fahrenheit) that’s just right to create rich compost free of pathogens and bugs.

And if you live in an apartment, condo, or most urban/suburban neighborhoods, there are likely regulatory codes (or neighbors with noses) that inhibit your ability to make compost.

You could buy an expensive plastic contraption to minimize the smell and hassle of making your own compost, but sometimes even that doesn’t work.

In those situations, you buy compost.

If you’re growing marijuana in soil, you mix in compost with your other growing media, but not much, because compost is rich in nitrogen that might burn your marijuana roots.

If you’re growing marijuana hydroponically in any type of hydroponics system—aeroponics, deep water culture, ebb and flow—the benefit of compost tea is that it flows easily through your fertigation system.

When I first heard about compost tea, I spent about $75 getting supplies for making it.

You need buckets, a pump, tubing, a special valve called a “gang” valve, molasses (to feed the microbes), aerator stones, and a screen to pour the tea through at the end of the process.

You also need reverse osmosis water.

You can’t trust municipal water because it has chlorines and chloramines that kill beneficial microbes in compost.

Nor can you trust well-water because it likely contains pollutants, heavy metals, poisons, iron, salts, or calcium… none of which are good for your marijuana roots or for making compost tea.

Using a multi-day process, you “brew” the tea by aerating it constantly after feeding the mixture molasses.

Then you turn off your pump, remove your tubing and bubblers from the bucket, settle the tea, and pour it off through a screen.

The tea is microbially active only for a very short time, so you have to use it right away.

If you’ve used the right type of compost and your tea-brewing process worked, the nutrients and beneficial microbes are active, and they’ll help your marijuana roots, leaves, metabolism, and root zone.

It was a fun experiment, making compost tea, but there was no way to know the nutritional composition of what I made, or if the beneficial microorganisms were alive in the tea.

The good news is I discovered you don’t need to make compost tea yourself.

In the hydroponics store I found and purchased Mother Earth Super Tea.

It cost about the same as the materials I bought for making my own tea.

I also purchased beneficial microbes made specifically for marijuana roots.

These are called Tarantula, Piranha, and Voodoo Juice.

The grower tech support department for the manufacturer of Mother Earth Super Tea said to use as an additive in any type of marijuana growing system soil or soilless, as a stand-alone base fertilizer, and as foliar spray.

The tea works well for roots, and so do the wide range of beneficial bacteria and fungi you get when using Tarantula, Piranha, and Voodoo Juice.

Marijuana roots are stronger, faster-growing, more densely branched, faster at nutrients uptake and more resistant to disease, temperature problems, drought, and overwatering.

Mother Earth smells like tea, and gives my marijuana roots an all-organic feed program in soil, soilless, or any other type of hydroponics garden.

After harvest, marijuana roots fed Mother Earth Tea can easily be seen as thicker, whiter, healthier.

marijuana rootsCompost tea benefits marijuana roots in all kinds of grow ops.
Compost Tea Supercharges Marijuana Roots
By Gary Anderson

In the ongoing debate between supporters of “organic” marijuana versus hydroponics marijuana, you often hear about “compost tea.”

You get faster marijuana growth, larger/stronger marijuana roots, detoxified soil and root zones, and protection against root zone diseases and pathogens when you use bioactive compost tea.

If you use compost tea as a foliar spray, your marijuana plants gain some protection from powdery mildew, gray mold, mites, thrips, and other organisms that commonly plague marijuana plants.

Compost tea contains nutritional elements that feed marijuana through roots and leaves, but important benefits also come from microorganisms active in compost that transfer into the tea.

Compost tea is made from compost…a solid-material “fermented” mixture containing things like leaves and other yard waste, discarded food items (such as banana peels, egg shells, coffee grounds, veggies), and base materials such as old newspapers.

You combine such materials in the proper ratio, and then continue to maintain proper conditions (aeration, ambient temperature, pH) so the mixture microbially decomposes into a material rich in nutrition for cannabis plants.

Making compost is complex and time-consuming.

If your compost pile is improperly made or maintained, you get bad smells, and you may not get the decomposition temperature range (130-157 degrees Fahrenheit) that’s just right to create rich compost free of pathogens and bugs.

And if you live in an apartment, condo, or most urban/suburban neighborhoods, there are likely regulatory codes (or neighbors with noses) that inhibit your ability to make compost.

You could buy an expensive plastic contraption to minimize the smell and hassle of making your own compost, but sometimes even that doesn’t work.

In those situations, you buy compost.

If you’re growing marijuana in soil, you mix in compost with your other growing media, but not much, because compost is rich in nitrogen that might burn your marijuana roots.

If you’re growing marijuana hydroponically in any type of hydroponics system—aeroponics, deep water culture, ebb and flow—the benefit of compost tea is that it flows easily through your fertigation system.

When I first heard about compost tea, I spent about $75 getting supplies for making it.

You need buckets, a pump, tubing, a special valve called a “gang” valve, molasses (to feed the microbes), aerator stones, and a screen to pour the tea through at the end of the process.

You also need reverse osmosis water.

You can’t trust municipal water because it has chlorines and chloramines that kill beneficial microbes in compost.

Nor can you trust well-water because it likely contains pollutants, heavy metals, poisons, iron, salts, or calcium… none of which are good for your marijuana roots or for making compost tea.

Using a multi-day process, you “brew” the tea by aerating it constantly after feeding the mixture molasses.

Then you turn off your pump, remove your tubing and bubblers from the bucket, settle the tea, and pour it off through a screen.

The tea is microbially active only for a very short time, so you have to use it right away.

If you’ve used the right type of compost and your tea-brewing process worked, the nutrients and beneficial microbes are active, and they’ll help your marijuana roots, leaves, metabolism, and root zone.

It was a fun experiment, making compost tea, but there was no way to know the nutritional composition of what I made, or if the beneficial microorganisms were alive in the tea.

The good news is I discovered you don’t need to make compost tea yourself.

In the hydroponics store I found and purchased Mother Earth Super Tea.

It cost about the same as the materials I bought for making my own tea.

I also purchased beneficial microbes made specifically for marijuana roots.

These are called Tarantula, Piranha, and Voodoo Juice.

The grower tech support department for the manufacturer of Mother Earth Super Tea said to use as an additive in any type of marijuana growing system soil or soilless, as a stand-alone base fertilizer, and as foliar spray.

The tea works well for roots, and so do the wide range of beneficial bacteria and fungi you get when using Tarantula, Piranha, and Voodoo Juice.

Marijuana roots are stronger, faster-growing, more densely branched, faster at nutrients uptake and more resistant to disease, temperature problems, drought, and overwatering.

Mother Earth smells like tea, and gives my marijuana roots an all-organic feed program in soil, soilless, or any other type of hydroponics garden.

After harvest, marijuana roots fed Mother Earth Tea can easily be seen as thicker, whiter, healthier.

posted By
Garrigan65


#20

@70sChick

Here are the 5 tea’s resipe’s

C
Compost tea is an extract of compost combined with de-chlorinated water containing beneficial microorganisms that has been used for centuries to encourage soil and plant health. The organic matter and its accompanying organisms chosen are of primary concern when making a nutrient rich compost tea. Clean compost and worm castings used solely or in conjunction are common tea bases, but you can also try making a bat guano tea mix. Composting Bat Manure for Tea Using bat manure for compost tea is one of the most nutrient and microorganism rich options. Bat dung is harvested dry after it has been composted by guano beetles and microbes and is obtained from only the insect and fruit feeding species. It can be worked directly into the soil as an incredible rich, non-malodorous fertilizer or converted into an extremely beneficial bat manure compost tea. Using bat guano tea has the benefit of not only nourishing the soil and plants, but also has been said to have bioremediation properties. Simply put, this means that the bat dung can aid in cleansing soils made toxic by the application of pesticides, herbicides, and chemical fertilizers. Using bat guano tea on foliage aids in the prevention of fungal diseases as well. Bat Guano Tea Recipe Used as a fertilizer, bat guano provides a higher concentration of nutrients than many other types. The NPK ratio of bat dung is a concentration of 10-3-1, or 10 percent nitrogen, 3 percent phosphorous and 1 percent potassium. Nitrogen facilitates rapid growth, phosphorus pushes healthy root systems and bloom development, and potassium aids in a plant’s general health. Bat guano tea is suitable for a wide variety of plants and is simple to make. A simple bat guano tea recipe consists of one cup of dung per gallon of non-chlorinated water. Chlorine in water kills beneficial microbial life, so if you have city water that is chlorinated, just leave it in an open container for several hours or overnight to allow the chlorine to naturally dissipate. Mix the two together, let sit overnight, strain and apply directly to your plants. Other bat guano tea recipes can be found all over the Internet. They can get more complex by adding additional ingredients such as unsulfured molasses, fish emulsion, worm castings, seaweed concentrate, humic acid, glacial rock dust and even specific species of bat guano — such as Mexican, Indonesian or Jamaican dung. As a foliar spray, apply the bat guano tea using a fine mist either in the early morning or pre-dusk. For root application, apply at the root zone followed by watering in to facilitate nutrients into the root system. Bat guano tea is not a fertilizer, but promotes a healthy biologically diverse soil with more efficient nutrient absorption, thereby eventually reducing the amount of fertilizer needed and promoting overall healthier plants. Use the bat guano tea as soon as possible. It will lose its nutritive power even as soon as overnight, so use it right away.t from harmful disease.

Using compost tea for cannabis hasn’t been adopted by growers until relatively recently, but it’s a great way to help grow organic cannabis at home. Organic compost tea benefits the cannabis plant by protecting it against various harmful elements and providing rich nutritional elements.

Compost tea should never be a 100% replacement for all soil additives, and there are still nutrients you should use for growing cannabis. But, when used as a soil drench, it can still be a great complement for other nutrients. And if you use compost tea as a foliar spray, it can provide some of its abundant micronutrients to cannabis via absorption through the leaves’ stomata.
What Are the Benefits of Compost Tea?
Watering a plant sprout

The goal of brewing compost tea is to introduce microorganisms to promote bigger, stronger, and more resilient plants. Spraying your cannabis plants with compost tea can place beneficial bacteria on the plants that are thought to crowd out bad bacteria and help strengthen the plant’s abilities to suppress diseases. When applied to soil, you’re adding to the soil food web by introducing a healthy population of microorganisms that are aerobic in nature. These organisms hold nutrients, aerate the soil, aide water retention, increase nutrient absorption in the plant, help grow healthy roots, and help prevent diseases.

However, the benefits of compost tea are debated in the agricultural world. Many gardeners report quality results from using compost tea, while others derive no benefits greater than you would see from applying compost. The uncertainty lies in whether or not growing and developing populations of microorganisms in the tea actually benefits the plants and can prevent disease.
RELATED STORY
Growing Organic Cannabis at Home

Personally, I’ve used compost tea regularly in gardens as I fully support the practice and believe in the benefits. Cannabis is developing into an industry where the use of pesticides is strongly regulated. Accordingly, it’s crucial to take preventative steps to stop diseases before they occur, and compost tea might be your solution. The cannabis community is filled with conscious individuals who are connected to what they grow. This connection has always left me wanting to improve upon the natural ecosystem that we benefit from and explore ways to do so organically and sustainably.
Compost Tea Key Ingredients: Your Recipe for Healthy Cannabis Plants
Farmer and her compost pile

In order for your organic compost tea to fully benefit your cannabis plant, you need to ensure you use the correct recipe and make it properly. A healthy compost tea pulls the soluble nutrients and microorganisms from compost; this includes bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and nematodes. Nematodes do not have a life cycle that is rapid enough to increase their population in the time it takes to brew a tea. However, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa can all increase their populations with the right foods and conditions.

Below are five key compost tea ingredients recommended by the Beneficial Living Center located in Arcata, California, to create a successful tea that will work best for your cannabis.

  1. Compost

Compost is the base for the tea, and a healthy compost should have large populations of microorganisms and nutrients. Sourcing your compost locally will help ensure the organisms in the compost are used to the local pathogens. Compost that contains developed mycelium (fungal colonies) populations will help aid the development of fungal growth in the tea.
RELATED STORY
What Are the Best Nutrients for Growing Cannabis?
2. Worm Castings

Worm castings are the byproduct expelled after a worm digests organic material. Castings provide a high density of nutrients in a broken-down, refined form that is readily available for the plant to consume. Worm castings also introduce microorganisms.
3. Fish Hydrolysate

Fish hydrolysate is produced by breaking down fish and crustaceans to create a nitrogen-dense product. Crustacean exoskeletons also have chitin, which works as an immune booster for plants. Fish hydrolysate also helps feed and increase the fungi populations.
RELATED STORY
Cannabis Terroir 101: What Is It, and What Factors Affect It?
4. Kelp

Kelp serves as a source of food for fungi that grow while the tea is brewing. It’s also thought to provide a surface for fungal colonies to attach to and develop.
5. Molasses

Molasses serves as a source of food for bacteria that grow while the tea is brewing.
5 Steps for Making Compost Tea
Compost tea bin

Making your own compost tea at home is easy. Follow these five key steps and you’ll soon be feeding your cannabis plants a nutrient-rich mix that will keep them healthy and happy.

  1. Build Your Compost Tea Brewer

Before you build your compost tea brewer, you need to consider the size of your cannabis garden. Most home gardens use a 5-gallon bucket. On the outside of the bucket, you’ll need to have an air pump connected to an aerator device at the bottom. The aerator and air pump will oxygenate the water so the microorganisms can breathe. You’ll also need a 400-micron mesh bag in which you can place the ingredients for the tea. While you can buy pre-built tea brewers, you can also easily make your own for a very affordable price.
2. Build Your Schedule

Tea brewing takes time, so it’s important to figure out when you want to apply the tea. Most teas generally take 24-36 hours to brew. You don’t want to let your tea brew for too long because the microorganism populations will develop to a point where they won’t have enough oxygen or space to live and will begin to die, which can damage your tea.
RELATED STORY

That being said, only start a tea when you know you’ll have time to apply it within 36 hours of brewing it. If you’re going to use it as a foliar spray, you want to time it so you can apply the compost tea in the evening or morning when the temperature is low and the sunlight is not direct. This period is also when the stomata (nutrient receptors on your plant’s foliage) are open to receive the nutrients.
3. Fill Your Compost Tea Bag

When creating your first batch of tea, keep the solution simple. If your water is coming from city lines, allow it to sit and breathe so the chlorine can to break down. Beneficial Living Center tea recipes are a good place to find tea formulas. Once your tea is brewing, keep it out of direct sunlight and make sure the air pump is running and oxygen is being pushed through the water.
RELATED STORY
Spider Mites, Fungus Gnats, and Root Aphids: How to Deal With 3 Common Cannabis Pests
4. Finalize Your Compost Tea

There are multiple products that can be added in the middle of your brewing process, towards the end, or right before application. Food for bacteria and fungi can be added halfway through your brewing process to increase the growth of microorganisms. Furthermore, products like SeaGreen and Actinovate can be added before the tea is applied in your garden for additional benefits.
5. Applying Compost Tea on Cannabis

The tea can be applied to the roots or as a foliar spray on the leaves of the cannabis plant. You can dilute your tea with water at a ratio anywhere between 1:20 when applying it to the roots. A basic tea can’t harm or burn your plants, so you may apply a potent dose freely. As a foliar spray, compost tea is generally only diluted with water to 1:2.

Don’t use drip lines to apply the compost tea because the tea will cause the drip line to clog over time. It’s important to either gravity feed the tea or use a diaphragm pump (as opposed to a centrifugal pump) to avoid chopping up and disrupting the active microorganisms when you water.

Will