Flowers look different. One stringy the other like small buds

Just curious why two of the same kind of auto plants could look different in flowering. These both ok still?
Gorilla Glue auto flower.


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Variations in strains are common looks like alot of foxtailing but otherwise looking good

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They are both ok. Bottom picture is for sure foxtailing. To prevent your buds from foxtailing, you need to know exactly what triggers this odd process. The main factor responsible for foxtailing revolves around stress, both above and below the soil level. Strange things happen when cannabis plants have to deal with too much stress. They can even start at the calyces. Light can act as a double-edged sword. If your lights are too intense, too close to your buds, or produce too much heat, they can cause foxtailing to arise.

  • Seedling phase: 20-25°C
  • Vegetative phase: 22-28°C
  • Flowering phase: 20-26°C

If the temperature of your growing greenhouse or garden exceeds these temperatures for an extended period of time, you might just see foxtailing flowers start to appear.

Root zone health

We can only observe the health of our plants above the soil. However, so much goes on just beneath the surface. Factors such as pH and microbial warfare can take a toll on the root system. If either of these factors starts to get out of hand, cannabis plants will start to feel the stress rising. If things reach a certain point, you might see foxtailing flowers, even if you’ve got everything above the soil under control. Check out the primary sources of root zone stress below.

pH

When it comes to pH, cannabis plants love slightly acidic growing mediums. Ideally, keep your soil at a [pH of between 6.0-7.0] Cannabis roots are able to uptake nutrients most successfully within this range.

Slight fluctuations are acceptable, but if levels sway too much in the wrong direction for too long, roots will fail to uptake nutrients and “lockout” will occur. This can cause plants to stress and possibly begin to foxtail

Bad microbes

To our naked eyes, the soil looks like an inert brown substance. But when we place a speck of soil under a microscope, it quickly becomes apparent that millions of microbes call this growing medium home.

Some of these lifeforms, including species of bacteria and fungi form a symbiotic relationship with cannabis roots and help them to uptake nutrients. But others are hostile and can wreak havoc.

Some creatures, such parasitic nematodes love to chew through roots and devour their contents. Their unrestrained grazing can cause leaves to become yellow and rot. This level of stress may also cause weed flowers to foxtail. You’ll discover key ways to keep your soil microbially healthy later on in this article.

Taken from royal queen seeds page so i cant link it

Both show foxtailing, probably too much light.

This one pretty well looks done.
Have you checked the trichomes?

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