Do seeds from a plant that was autoflowering produce seeds that are autoflowering?

just a question on how autoflowers work?

Yes the seeds should produce another auto flowering plant it’s in the gentitics of it.

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They should. Most autoflowers are 1/2 ruderalis, so they will contain ruderalis with a back cross. Some recombination of genes can occur, but the probability is high that the autoflower trait will be retained.

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Autoflowering cannabis varieties automatically switch from vegetative growth to the flowering stage with age, as opposed to the ratio of light to dark hours required with photoperiod dependent/short-day strains. Many autoflowers will be ready to harvest in less than 10 weeks from seed.[1] Dwarf varieties can have short stature[2] while still giving decent yield. Conversely “super autos” can take over 100 days to mature and can reach over 6 feet tall.

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If my understanding of genetics is correct then the simple answer is yes.

The complicated answer is it could theoretically after many many generations of crossing create a randomized auto/photo strain that would have little to no consistency to what it does

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Self fertilized or fertilized by another auto? Most likely.

Cross fertilized by a photoperiod? You could do a Punnet square to get an idea of the possibilities.

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Most cases if self pollinated then they tend to turn hermaphrodite @end. All is good @week 6-7 in flower and then BAM.
Thats only My expierence! NOT any science behind this and all happening outdoors, there be maybe some other factor included.

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so kinda what i’m getting from this is that “commercially” grown pot that has seeds in it will likely not be viable at all. when you get only one seed in a bag it is likely self pollinated so will be herme eventually? @MattyBear @SlowOldGuy @blackthumbbetty @dbrn32

I don’t know if either statement is true. I remember being plenty high after plucking a bunch of seeds from a small bag. And the herm, I think you could say self pollinated seeds may be more likely to herm. But not necessarily a guarantee will it herm.

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Seeds from commercially grown pot will be viable. Commercially grown pot likely is treated the same way our homegrown is.

Bag seed could either be cross fertilized with another plant or back fertilized with itself. If hermie, then a back cross will be more likely to herm, but if simply crossed, it will be less likely to herm because the non-hermie genes from the mother are likely dominant.

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i don’t know if Leafly.com is legitimate to put on here. they don’t sell seeds so i don’t know, but it seems to have lots of info for those in the states looking about pot info. just read an article about bag seeds and this author’s take on it is try it, it might be a cross between two strains that will be awesome… but probably not, more of a chance that it will be herme from stress due to excess heat or environment change in last part of flowering that got pollinated.

And that’s why a back cross is more likely to be hermie.

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@WickedAle @beginner2d yea i’ve just started one so i will keep a sharp eye on it throughout the flower stage and will keep the other to see what comes of this first one. at most i will be growing 6 plants at once eventually and i don’t really want to waste a space for the hassle of having to deal with hermes as it sounds likely to me that your chance of getting something w/o the herme deal is probably 90 to 99% against. but i will give it a try once! mine will be inside a tent.

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http://scienceprimer.com/punnett-square-calculator

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wow! neat article @blackthumbbetty thanks a bunch! it looks a little advanced for me to understand by first glance, but i’m sure i will get it when i take the time to go over it better, i just glanced thru it.

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Simple genetics would put it at 50% assuming a single hermie gene is ressesive. Yet, the hermie genes are more complicated. @blackthumbbetty Unfortunately you can not calculate with a calculator unless you know the number of genes (alleles) controlling the trait and the contents of the alleles in the back-crossed mother and/or crossed “father”.

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but that calc would be good if you were going to start doing your own cross breeding, right?

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Years of dedicated study. Or simply roll the dice and watch her like a hawk.

I am sure sophisticated seed companies with sequencing capability are already studying this…aka Monsanto, Syngenta

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i was always interested in genetics since being introduced to it in hs but never did anything with it after. another good subject to get back into if i get bored and decide to do some strain development later… that will be like that book i have been thinking of writing for 50 years lol.

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You can get an idea, though

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