Daisy Chain LED's

Hi All. Newbie here :slight_smile: Can i daisy chain a 1000w LED and 600W LED?

Appreciate the responses!

Thanks

Sure can. It’s just like another outlet.

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Thanks for the reply! So wattage doesn’t matter. Thanks again

No, it just takes the 120v and splits it into two lines (like how a power strip splits it into like 6 lines). One goes to the LED driver, the other goes to the outlet on the case. You could plug any 120v device into it if you want.

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Well, eventually it does. You do have the limitations of the circuit they are plugged into. If (for example) you have a 15 amp circuit running 120 volts, the limit is 1800 watts. 80% of load capacity is considered the safe maximum, so that brings it down to 1440 watts. If you are on a 20 amp circuit, that would be 1920 watts maximum.
With all that said though, the odds are very good that neither of your lights draws what you think they do. If you look at the sticker on the light fixture, you may find that they draw significantly less - probably in the 150-250 watt range.

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Slightly off topic but what does the 1000 represent then. If it doesn’t draw that wattage…doesn’t output that wattage…? I have already moved on from those after being around here week, just curious now.

The 1000 typically refers to how many 10watt LEDs are on the board. 100 10watt LEDs =1000watts. Misleading advertising. Always look for draw from outlet.

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Ah thank you.

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Indeed. You will notice that in almost all cases they will refer to a light as a “600W” (like a part number) or and not as “600 watt,” as that would definitely be a lie.

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One more dumb question. Are draw and output directly proportionate or just positively correlated. Like if my light is 500 watts actual but I dim it to 50% is my draw then exactly 250 or something else or is that light dependent to some degree…okay maybe two questions is it then better to run at at 50% and have it twice as close for cost saving or at 100% and twice as far away as that intensity is better for the plants somehow as long as it’s not close enough to burn them?

Regarding power: Only an expensive/calibrated potentiometer will be exactly 50% if you set it there. You can rest assured that it should be pretty close, though. You can always use a tool like a Killawatt meter if you are really curious:

As far as closer/50% power versus further/100% power… there are too many variables to just say “this way is better” - the efficiency of your ballast and LEDs, the angle of the lenses (if any), the spread between LEDs, etc. You would pretty much have to test your individual light fixture with an expensive PAR meter to find out which yields the best for you, factoring in the power usage. And - 50% less electricity doesn’t necessarily mean 50% less light - this is where the efficiency of different LEDs come into play - and some react differently in regard to color temperature shift at lesser current than others.

But - the cost to power an LED light is almost negligible. I say - use whichever method is most convenient for you. Personally, I would rather take 20 seconds to raise or lower my light at full power than to mess around with the potentiometer.

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@dbrn32 would be the guy to ask about this.

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Looks like @TommyBahama has this one.

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I had a feeling the answer wasn’t simple :yum:. Thank you for your time I have a better idea now.

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Not really, the fixtures don’t put out watts they consume watts. The 1000 in this case is a misleading number used by manufacturer to indicate the maximum potential consumption by particular leds installed within the fixture.

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