Beginner - White Widow Auto, 1st grow journal

FINALLY! The AC repairman showed up after 4 days of insufferable 90+F temps!! Looking forward to getting my CFLs back on as sidelights. Also, spread some DE on the bucket with the outside soil as a precaution against hidden critters from beneath!

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I hope I’m not jumping the gun here! Day 10, and my biggest Widow was starting to lean pretty heavy toward the light. So I just went ahead and staked her and rotated her 180 degrees. It looks drastic, but she was already leaned about halfway, I just nudged her a little more. If it stresses her too much, I guess the damage is already done and I learned another lesson. My rationale was, since she’s an auto, I should start early.

Anyone have any thoughts on when to start LST? Am I a little early?

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I think the early the better, and in your case, this is about as early as possible! Looks good to me!
I once LST’ed a weed plant into an almost complete full circle. It’s amazing how you can train a plant to grow.
I saw a picture of a man who trained a plant outside to be the exact shape of a chair. So now he sits on his chair outside and relaxes, but his chair is actually a living plant! It was incredible!

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Everyone should check this guy out! I found it!

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VERY cool!! :sunglasses:

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I dont understand why your doing that.But i definitely would like to know cuz i have an auto ww that while i was on vacation stretched to far and has serious Gangsta lean. Obviously your not going to train it into a place to sit ,that would be cool to sit in and smoe aome

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Here ahe is here trying to get out oof the view of the camera cuz she knows she looks funny

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@4play - “LST techniques typically involve pulling the plant in a downward direction so that it grows more laterally and exposed the lower branches to more light (and light intensity). Bud formation will increase on these branches, resulting in a higher yield for each plant and each watt of light. In the end, you get more bud for less bucks.”

That’s from this page, which explains LST in detail:

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Look into it @4play, it’s called LST for Low Stress Training. It’s an amazing technique and I truly believe one of the best and easiest techniques. You can train your plant, through bending and tying off, to be any way you want it to be. Like @kushpa was saying, it allows for better growth from areas that usually don’t see much light. It helps with creating an even canopy as well. I suggest it for any beginners looking to increase their yield while learning a lot! It doesn’t have to be drastic either. It can simply be just tying a branch or two back, or just a few strategic tie offs to make a certain shape. It’s fun, hands down. And gives you experience with a great technique.

Treez

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Ya I read the link but the one I have leaning is a white widow auto starting its 3rd week. Think it would benefit on its short life cycle.I read all the info on the link he provided and am down for it

At the least, it can’t hurt. You’ve got a start, so it’s worth a try. These next couple of weeks should be your fastest growth period. Mine’s also WWA, and I’m on Day 10, so not that far behind. Even if you only get one extra main cola, it’ll be worth it!

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Im going to transplant tomorrow in 3 gl and start training her.i have some little pipe cleaner tie downs i made. I will put her strap on lol

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What good does it do to start with 6 plants if you can’t lose a couple along the way, right? :unamused:

Okay, so my Golden Leaf is doing great, a set of triple fans, working on the 3rd pair of true leaves in 1-1/2 weeks!

And ONE of my White Widows is at the same pace. Both of these have been under LED a couple days longer, both are in their final, 5-gallon homes. However, my 3 outdoor-destined Widows in the 5" peat pots ain’t doin’ so hot!

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So I decided, what the hell, let’s just go ahead and set one of the ladies outside and see what happens! So I built a little mini-greenhouse dome out of a root beer bottle, cut some ventilation slits, and set 'er out!

The location is where my 1st (disastrous) attempt to grow took place in April. I dug a 2’x2’x2’ hole and filled it with topsoil from my cornfield and a half a bucket of horse manure. It’s been sitting idle since May.

Guess we’ll see what happens! I’m going to try and keep nurturing my other two lagging Widows inside, and hopefully be able to set them out soon.

One final note, and this could be a killer. The Widow I set outside had gotten just a smidge close to a CFL yesterday and got a mild dose of heat stress. It had a little yellowing along the outer edges of the main leaves, and just a tiny tinge of brown in one place. She may be dead by morning, but if so, I’ll just chalk it up to experience and move on. I’ve got 2 more WW seeds to take the place of their fallen comrades, I was gonna start them the first of the month anyway! :relaxed:

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My auto widows are growing slower than my reg pineapple haze. I figured the autos would develop faster . All 4 started same time everything is the same except the strain.


The widows are the 2 smaller ones with less vegetation -1 is strapped down ,since it stretched i figured try some LST and see what happens,probably going outside once the heat index comes down from 108° with 90° humidity. If not i will keep them inside

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Exactly 2 weeks in, and I’m thrilled with my main White Widow! She’s responding well to LST, and I’ve had some great growth in just the past few days. Couldn’t be happier so far!

My Golden Leaf is also doing well. Not quite as big as the Widow, but still a respectable grow. And she’s photoperiod, so she’s bound to be a little slower. Just waiting for her to get big enough to FIM, hopefully in another week or so?

I also started a new indoor WW, since I set all 3 outdoor Widows out (more on that next). Nothing to show yet, but I went ahead and started it right in its final home, a 5-gallon bucket in the tent. This should give me a little extra stash a couple weeks after first harvest! :slight_smile:

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So my 3 outdoor widows were all lagging, and even though they didn’t appear to be root bound, I chalked it up to the little peat pots they were in. Plus, they all seemed to be getting heat stress from the light, even though they weren’t any closer than the others. So I set them all out, two in the ground under protective domes, one with no dome, in a 5-gallon bucket.

Here’s a “before” and “after” of the first one I set out. After 2 days of full sunlight under the dome, you can see new vegetative growth, the top leaves are filling out, very happy with that!


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Here’s the second one, haven’t noticed much yet, but she’s only been out one day. She does seem to have opened up a bit.

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And finally, I just set this one out last night. Thought I’d try one in natural dirt in a bucket outside and see how she fares. This is last night and this morning, maybe a little movement/growth? Hard to tell yet.


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@ktreez420 - Hey, I noticed a comment you made about the yellowing of the leaves being a pH problem, and I think maybe that’s what my issue was instead of heat stress! Makes sense, all 3 slow growth, all 3 yellowing. I tested the pH of the soil in the peat pots, and it was 7.5+! They’re all in natural soil now outside, I haven’t tested it, but I’ll bet it’s fairly neutral.

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Early yellowing is a key sign of pH problems, and nutrients issues, which usually stem from the pH problem.

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I would suggest you adding perlite or vermiculite to your soil next time, and definitely for when you transplant! It will help with the drainage of your soil and aid with root development.

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Yeah, I zoned out on the transplants, too big a hurry. On the upside, the one you clued me about a couple of weeks ago is the Golden Leaf, I added half a bag of perlite to that outside soul, and she’s doing great!

Speaking of perlite, I’m going to try a 1/2 perlite, 1/2 peat moss mix for starting clones when the Golden Leaf gets big enough. I’ve got rooting gel, and am hoping to get 3 good ones if I’m lucky.

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