Anyone try to clean Apera bulb probe?

Trying to figure out why my apera fc60 pppm/ec readings seem off. Anyone with a bulb style ever clean it? Read about using acid on them to rejuvenate it. Trying this before buying a new probe.

Bluelab makes a probe cleaner and brush

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I clean it after every time I dip it in nutrient solution. I just dip a small paint brush in distilled water and clean it that way.

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I do same a @Bobbydigital and just give it a quick rub with a soft tooth brush after each use. So far so good.
:wink::+1::v:

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Im gonna try this stuff first before buying a new 56 dollar probe.:expressionless: Read people saying if its off I can try to shock it back.

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Cleaning & reconditioning pH electrodes

Hamilton sensorsOften the pH meters are used in applications, which require regular cleaning of the electrode. These applications involve very hard waters, dirty samples like soil slurries, viscous materials or samples with high oil and protein content. We do not recommend these procedures for persons unfamiliar with or unable to use safe techniques involving these chemicals: Detergents, HCl (Hydrochloric Acid), and NaOH (Sodium Hydroxide).

Single PoreMethod 1

Soak the electrode in a 0.4 molar concentration of HCl (hydrochloric acid) for 10 minutes, then rinse the electrode with deionized or distilled water. This should remove any organic protein from the glass electrode and the surface of the reference electrode.

Method 2

Soak the electrode in a 3.8 or 4.0 molar KCl (potassium chloride) solution heated to 50°C for 1 hour. Allow the KCl solution to cool down to room temperature, then rinse the electrode with deionized or distilled water. This will open and clean the reference electrode of all contaminants.

Method 3

Soak the electrode in a 4.01 pH buffer solution (EC-BU-4BT), heated to 50°C for 1 hour. Allow the buffer to cool down to room temperature, then rinse the electrode with deionized or distilled water. This will open and clean the reference electrode.

Method 4

After each use, rinse the electrode in 0.5 N or 1% HCl. If you have a build-up of oil or protein contaminants, try soaking the electrode in warm detergent and water solution. Degreasing dishwashing detergents or stain removing pre wash pretreatment are ideal for this: any brand will do. An overnight soak may be needed if build-up is heavy. Then rinse the pH sensor in deionized or distilled water and soak for 10 minutes in 1% HCl. Rinse the pH sensor in deionized or distilled water and check in buffers. If the pH sensor calibrates to buffers it can be used in tests. When the pH electrode cannot be calibrated even after attempts to clean it, it must be replaced.

Method 5

For protein removal, soak the pH electrode in contact lens enzymatic cleaner solution overnight. The enzymes will remove proteins from glass and plastic.

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Thx @WickedAle you the real mvp brah! Hoping my ph is quicker to find I also think my ec/ppm is way way high and not in a cheech and chong kinda way.

Do we have to use our tester makers solutions? Apera says to only use theirs but it looks like there are cheaper 3rd party chems. I just ordered the 6 solution set for my meter and was just wondering. thx

I typically stick with manufacturers recommendations on stuff like test equipment.

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Yeah I know but there seem to be conpanies that make money making lab accurate solutions and they seem cheaper at times.

Yeah, they can be pretty proud of buffing solutions. I just know if I went against manufacturers recommendations and something started going wrong with the plant, I’d never trust my meter

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Totally get you brother. At some point I might gove it a try down the road.lol

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Tbh I got a set of 6-8 oz apera solutions that I can triple calibrate instead of 2 and a 4 oz bottle of storing solution for 60 bucks also has some solution storing liquid.

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