Afghani appreciation

First time grower here…I wanna show off my baby because I think she’s gorgeous and all my friends are sick of me talking about her, hahaha.

Also, if anyone else has pics of an Afghani or another landrace strain, please feel free to share the love!! :purple_heart::heart_eyes::ok_hand:





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Very :star_struck: :ok_hand:

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She is Frosty :heart_eyes: nice lookin plant :100:

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Afghan hybrid… Super Skunk Auto … day 98…





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What a beauty!

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Not yet. It is next in line.
I like what I’m seeing. Hope mine will do as well.

It looks like you kept her natural. No training.

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Thank you!! Hopefully you get good results with yours as well when you grow it.
I did keep her natural cuz it’s my first grow and I didn’t have the know how…but on my next grow I think I wanna try SCROG

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Letting it grow natural was a good choice. It is supposed to be a fairly compact strain.
I use adjustable frames with a mason line net. I don’t SCROG per se, but I make use of the net to shape and distribute buds.

If you want to see a monster SCROG check this
PiratedSoldiers 5x5 Indoor Monster’s :imp:

Another is Nugz / nugget farm

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Very nice Kat :sunglasses: :peace_symbol: :heart:

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Congrats on your wonderful first grow, @Kat91 !

I love my Afghan that I harvested earlier this year, it’s so good for bedtime.

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That’s gonna make some sweet buds for you Kat… congrats :beers:

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Well done! Think I got a buzz just looking at her sideways!

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I believe Durbin Poison is a land race strain. Correct me if I’m wrong and I’ll retract it! I love love love the high this has.



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It certainly is. However you can tell from that bud structure that yours has been Dutched-up. You can see this in the samples submitted to the Phylos Galaxy; e.g.

The Genetic Novelty and Genetic Variation boxes are the most telling. By its very nature a domesticate/landrace should be rare or at least uncommon. After all there is only one Durban in the world. There should also be very little variation among an inbred line as changes in the genotype will quickly spread throughout the entire population.

So it’s a juiced up version of the original? I just thought they looked like that cause of all the love I poured into them. :slight_smile: :yum:

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It’s still the landrace genes. Just selective breeding to bring out it’s full potential.

Yep. They pump’em full of Skunk or Northern Lights or whatever to make’em shorter, denser, faster, more potent, etc.

No doubt about that. Those are some lovely plants.

If it was just selective breeding you wouldn’t see the wild genetic variations as landraces have already been selectively bred for 100s of years. To introduce that sort of variation into a stable line you need more than mere selection pressure.

My understanding is they are taking the best of those landraces and crossing (with those best versions) to get the perfect iteration of the landrace. Am I wrong?

What do you think the farmers who have been working those lines for generations have been doing? They cull undesirables, only use seeds from the best to sow next year’s crop, etc. Always working toward the best plant for their purpose. Sometimes that means selecting the most potent or the best multipurpose or whatever. The western breeders started with the “perfect iteration” when they collected the seeds from the place of origin.

The only way to improve them further is to continue the slow selective process that has been in place since the dawn of agriculture, direct genetic manipulation (GMO) or introducing new genetic material.

So once collected they out-cross them (introduce new genetic material); e.g. with NL for more resin, Skunk for denser buds, Haze for higher THC. Hopefully during the process they are back-crossing with the original variety in order to preserve it’s best unique traits but you inevitably change something of the original. Whether these changes are improvements or not is a matter of taste and purpose.

Remember landraces are not wild growing plants. They have been carefully selected and tended for as long as agriculture has existed. This common misunderstanding is part of why the academic literature is moving toward the term “domesticate” as a more accurate representation.

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@poly
Ah okay.
So I bought that Afghan 90 heirloom from that Real seed place. So it has been crossed with others and not a true Landrace (Dutched up)?

I was thinking the took the very best genetics of the Landrace and brought them forward. As Afghani landrace are not clones. Although selectively breed, they had individual characteristics.

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